Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Antibody persistence and neutralising activity in primary school students and staff: Prospective active surveillance, June to December 2020, England.
Ireland, Georgina; Jeffery-Smith, Anna; Zambon, Maria; Hoschler, Katja; Harris, Ross; Poh, John; Baawuah, Frances; Beckmann, Joanne; Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Ahmad, Shazaad; Garstang, Joanna; Brent, Andrew J; Brent, Bernadette; Aiano, Felicity; Amin-Chowdhury, Zahin; Letley, Louise; Jones, Samuel E I; Kall, Meaghan; Patel, Monika; Gopal, Robin; Borrow, Ray; Linley, Ezra; Amirthalingam, Gayatri; Brown, Kevin E; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N.
  • Ireland G; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Jeffery-Smith A; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Zambon M; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Hoschler K; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Harris R; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Poh J; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Baawuah F; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Beckmann J; East London NHS Foundation Trust, 9 Allie Street, London E1 8DE, United Kingdom.
  • Okike IO; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Ahmad S; University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, 201 London Road, Derby DE1 2TZ, United Kingdom.
  • Garstang J; Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL, United Kingdom.
  • Brent AJ; Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust, Holt Street, Aston, B7 4BN, United Kingdom.
  • Brent B; Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7HE, United Kingdom.
  • Aiano F; Wellington Square, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, United Kingdom.
  • Amin-Chowdhury Z; Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Old Road, Oxford OX3 7HE, United Kingdom.
  • Letley L; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Jones SEI; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Kall M; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Patel M; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Gopal R; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Borrow R; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Linley E; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Amirthalingam G; Public Health England, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom.
  • Brown KE; Public Health England, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom.
  • Ramsay ME; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
  • Ladhani SN; Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5EQ, United Kingdom.
EClinicalMedicine ; 41: 101150, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446584
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Prospective, longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 sero-surveillance in schools across England was initiated after the first national lockdown, allowing comparison of child and adult antibody responses over time.

METHODS:

Prospective active serological surveillance in 46 primary schools in England tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies during June, July and December 2020. Samples were tested for nucleocapsid (N) and receptor binding domain (RBD) antibodies, to estimate antibody persistence at least 6 months after infection, and for the correlation of N, RBD and live virus neutralising activity.

FINDINGS:

In June 2020, 1,344 staff and 835 students were tested. Overall, 11.5% (95%CI 9.4-13.9) and 11.3% (95%CI 9.2-13.6; p = 0.88) of students had nucleoprotein and RBD antibodies, compared to 15.6% (95%CI 13.7-17.6) and 15.3% (95%CI 13.4-17.3; p = 0.83) of staff. Live virus neutralising activity was detected in 79.8% (n = 71/89) of nucleocapsid and 85.5% (71/83) of RBD antibody positive children. RBD antibodies correlated more strongly with neutralising antibodies (rs=0.7527; p<0.0001) than nucleocapsid antibodies (rs=0.3698; p<0.0001). A median of 24.4 weeks later, 58.2% (107/184) participants had nucleocapsid antibody seroreversion, compared to 20.9% (33/158) for RBD (p<0.001). Similar seroreversion rates were observed between staff and students for nucleocapsid (p = 0.26) and RBD-antibodies (p = 0.43). Nucleocapsid and RBD antibody quantitative results were significantly lower in staff compared to students (p = 0.028 and <0.0001 respectively) at baseline, but not at 24 weeks (p = 0.16 and p = 0.37, respectively).

INTERPRETATION:

The immune response in children following SARS-CoV-2 infection was robust and sustained (>6 months) but further work is required to understand the extent to which this protects against reinfection.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study / Screening study Language: English Journal: EClinicalMedicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.eclinm.2021.101150

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study / Screening study Language: English Journal: EClinicalMedicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.eclinm.2021.101150