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Intravenous bamlanivimab use associates with reduced hospitalization in high-risk patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.
Ganesh, Ravindra; Pawlowski, Colin F; O'Horo, John C; Arndt, Lori L; Arndt, Richard F; Bell, Sarah J; Bierle, Dennis M; Borgen, Molly Destro; Hanson, Sara N; Heyliger, Alexander; Larsen, Jennifer J; Lenehan, Patrick J; Orenstein, Robert; Puranik, Arjun; Speicher, Leigh L; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Wilker, Caroline G; Badley, Andrew D; Razonable, Raymund R.
  • Ganesh R; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Pawlowski CF; nference, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  • O'Horo JC; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Arndt LL; Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Arndt RF; Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Bell SJ; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Bierle DM; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Borgen MD; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Hanson SN; Mayo Clinic Health System, Mankato, Minnesota, USA.
  • Heyliger A; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Larsen JJ; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Lenehan PJ; nference, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Orenstein R; Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
  • Puranik A; nference, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Speicher LL; Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA.
  • Tulledge-Scheitel SM; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Venkatakrishnan AJ; nference, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Wilker CG; Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Badley AD; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
  • Razonable RR; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
J Clin Invest ; 131(19)2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448085
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUNDClinical data to support the use of bamlanivimab for the treatment of outpatients with mild to moderate coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) are needed.METHODS2335 Patients who received single-dose bamlanivimab infusion between November 12, 2020, and February 17, 2021, were compared with a propensity-matched control of 2335 untreated patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 at Mayo Clinic facilities across 4 states. The primary outcome was the rate of hospitalization at days 14, 21, and 28.RESULTSThe median age of the population was 63 years; 47.3% of the bamlanivimab-treated cohort were 65 years or more; 49.3% were female and 50.7% were male. High-risk characteristics included hypertension (54.2%), BMI greater than or equal to 35 (32.4%), diabetes mellitus (26.5%), chronic lung disease (25.1%), malignancy (16.6%), and renal disease (14.5%). Patients who received bamlanivimab had lower all-cause hospitalization rates at days 14 (1.5% vs. 3.5%; risk ratio [RR], 0.41), 21 (1.9% vs. 3.9%; RR, 0.49), and 28 (2.5% vs. 3.9%; RR, 0.63). Secondary exploratory outcomes included lower intensive care unit (ICU) admission rates at days 14 (0.14% vs. 1%; RR, 0.14), 21 (0.25% vs.1%; RR, 0.25), and 28 (0.56% vs.1.1%; RR. 0.51) and lower all-cause mortality at days 14 (0% vs. 0.33%), 21 (0.05% vs. 0.4%; RR,0.13), and 28 (0.11% vs. 0.44%; RR, 0.26). Adverse events were uncommon with bamlanivimab, occurring in 19 of 2355 patients, and were most commonly fever (n = 6), nausea (n = 5), and lightheadedness (n = 3).CONCLUSIONSAmong high-risk patients with mild to moderate COVID-19, treatment with bamlanivimab was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of hospitalization, ICU admission, and mortality compared with usual care.FUNDINGMayo Clinic.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Hospitalization Type of study: Etiology study / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: JCI151697

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Hospitalization Type of study: Etiology study / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: JCI151697