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Comparative kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike protein RBD IgGs and neutralizing antibodies in convalescent and naïve recipients of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine versus COVID-19 patients.
Trougakos, Ioannis P; Terpos, Evangelos; Zirou, Christina; Sklirou, Aimilia D; Apostolakou, Filia; Gumeni, Sentiljana; Charitaki, Ioanna; Papanagnou, Eleni-Dimitra; Bagratuni, Tina; Liacos, Christine-Ivy; Scorilas, Andreas; Korompoki, Eleni; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.
  • Trougakos IP; Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. itrougakos@biol.uoa.gr.
  • Terpos E; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. eterpos@med.uoa.gr.
  • Zirou C; Thoracic Diseases General Hospital Sotiria, Athens, Greece.
  • Sklirou AD; Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Apostolakou F; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, "Aghia Sophia" Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece.
  • Gumeni S; Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Charitaki I; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Papanagnou ED; Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Bagratuni T; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Liacos CI; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Scorilas A; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Korompoki E; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Papassotiriou I; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, "Aghia Sophia" Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece.
  • Kastritis E; Department of Clinical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, Alexandra General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • Dimopoulos MA; Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 208, 2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455966
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has caused a still evolving global pandemic. Given the worldwide vaccination campaign, the understanding of the vaccine-induced versus COVID-19-induced immunity will contribute to adjusting vaccine dosing strategies and speeding-up vaccination efforts.

METHODS:

Anti-spike-RBD IgGs and neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) titers were measured in BNT162b2 mRNA vaccinated participants (n = 250); we also investigated humoral and cellular immune responses in vaccinated individuals (n = 21) of this cohort 5 months post-vaccination and assayed NAbs levels in COVID-19 hospitalized patients (n = 60) with moderate or severe disease, as well as in COVID-19 recovered patients (n = 34).

RESULTS:

We found that one (boosting) dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine triggers robust immune (i.e., anti-spike-RBD IgGs and NAbs) responses in COVID-19 convalescent healthy recipients, while naïve recipients require both priming and boosting shots to acquire high antibody titers. Severe COVID-19 triggers an earlier and more intense (versus moderate disease) immune response in hospitalized patients; in all cases, however, antibody titers remain at high levels in COVID-19 recovered patients. Although virus infection promotes an earlier and more intense, versus priming vaccination, immune response, boosting vaccination induces antibody titers significantly higher and likely more durable versus COVID-19. In support, high anti-spike-RBD IgGs/NAbs titers along with spike (vaccine encoded antigen) specific T cell clones were found in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively, of vaccinated individuals 5 months post-vaccination.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support vaccination efficacy, also suggesting that vaccination likely offers more protection than natural infection.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Topics: Vaccines Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: BMC Med Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12916-021-02090-6

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Topics: Vaccines Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: BMC Med Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12916-021-02090-6