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Prior infection with SARS-CoV-2 boosts and broadens Ad26.COV2.S immunogenicity in a variant-dependent manner.
Keeton, Roanne; Richardson, Simone I; Moyo-Gwete, Thandeka; Hermanus, Tandile; Tincho, Marius B; Benede, Ntombi; Manamela, Nelia P; Baguma, Richard; Makhado, Zanele; Ngomti, Amkele; Motlou, Thopisang; Mennen, Mathilda; Chinhoyi, Lionel; Skelem, Sango; Maboreke, Hazel; Doolabh, Deelan; Iranzadeh, Arash; Otter, Ashley D; Brooks, Tim; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Moon, James C; Grifoni, Alba; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Blackburn, Jonathan; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Williamson, Carolyn; Riou, Catherine; Goga, Ameena; Garrett, Nigel; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Gray, Glenda; Ntusi, Ntobeko A B; Moore, Penny L; Burgers, Wendy A.
  • Keeton R; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Richardson SI; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Moyo-Gwete T; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Hermanus T; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Tincho MB; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Benede N; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Manamela NP; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Baguma R; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Makhado Z; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Ngomti A; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Motlou T; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Mennen M; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa.
  • Chinhoyi L; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa.
  • Skelem S; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa.
  • Maboreke H; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Chemical and Systems Biology, Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Doolabh D; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Iranzadeh A; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Otter AD; National Infection Service, Public Health England, Porton Down, UK.
  • Brooks T; National Infection Service, Public Health England, Porton Down, UK.
  • Noursadeghi M; Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, UK.
  • Moon JC; Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University College London, London, UK; Barts Heart Centre, St Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.
  • Grifoni A; Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA.
  • Weiskopf D; Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA.
  • Sette A; Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
  • Blackburn J; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Chemical and Systems Biology, Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Hsiao NY; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; NHLS Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Williamson C; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Wellcome Centre for Infectious Diseases Research in Africa, University of Cape Town, Cape
  • Riou C; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Wellcome Centre for Infectious Diseases Research in Africa, University of Cape Town, Cape
  • Goga A; South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Garrett N; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Durban, South Africa; Discipline of Public Health Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Bekker LG; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Gray G; South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Ntusi NAB; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa; Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape T
  • Moore PL; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa; MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: pennym@nicd.ac.za.
  • Burgers WA; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of Medical Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Wellcome Centre for Infectious Diseases Research in Africa, University of Cape Town, Cape
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(11): 1611-1619.e5, 2021 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466221
Preprint
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ABSTRACT
The Johnson and Johnson Ad26.COV2.S single-dose vaccine represents an attractive option for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination in countries with limited resources. We examined the effect of prior infection with different SARS-CoV-2 variants on Ad26.COV2.S immunogenicity. We compared participants who were SARS-CoV-2 naive with those either infected with the ancestral D614G virus or infected in the second wave when Beta predominated. Prior infection significantly boosts spike-binding antibodies, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and neutralizing antibodies against D614G, Beta, and Delta; however, neutralization cross-reactivity varied by wave. Robust CD4 and CD8 T cell responses are induced after vaccination, regardless of prior infection. T cell recognition of variants is largely preserved, apart from some reduction in CD8 recognition of Delta. Thus, Ad26.COV2.S vaccination after infection could result in enhanced protection against COVID-19. The impact of the infecting variant on neutralization breadth after vaccination has implications for the design of second-generation vaccines based on variants of concern.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Vaccination / COVID-19 Vaccines / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Cell Host Microbe Journal subject: Microbiology Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.chom.2021.10.003

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Vaccination / COVID-19 Vaccines / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Cell Host Microbe Journal subject: Microbiology Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.chom.2021.10.003