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Vaccination Coverage by Age 24 Months Among Children Born in 2017 and 2018 - National Immunization Survey-Child, United States, 2018-2020.
Hill, Holly A; Yankey, David; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Singleton, James A; Sterrett, Natalie.
  • Hill HA; Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
  • Yankey D; Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
  • Elam-Evans LD; Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
  • Singleton JA; Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
  • Sterrett N; Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(41): 1435-1440, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468852
ABSTRACT
Immunization is a safe and cost-effective means of preventing illness in young children and interrupting disease transmission within the community.* The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends vaccination of children against 14 diseases during the first 24 months of life (1). CDC uses National Immunization Survey-Child (NIS-Child) data to monitor routine coverage with ACIP-recommended vaccines in the United States at the national, regional, state, territorial, and selected local levels.† CDC assessed vaccination coverage by age 24 months among children born in 2017 and 2018, with comparisons to children born in 2015 and 2016. Nationally, coverage was highest for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (92.7%); ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (91.9%); ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.6%); and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (VAR) (90.9%). Coverage was lowest for ≥2 doses of influenza vaccine (60.6%). Coverage among children born in 2017-2018 was 2.1-4.5 percentage points higher than it was among those born in 2015-2016 for rotavirus vaccine, ≥1 dose of hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), the HepB birth dose, and ≥2 doses of influenza vaccine. Only 1.0% of children had received no vaccinations by age 24 months. Disparities in coverage were seen for race/ethnicity, poverty status, and health insurance status. Coverage with most vaccines was lower among children who were not privately insured. The largest disparities between insurance categories were among uninsured children, especially for ≥2 doses of influenza vaccine, the combined 7-vaccine series, § and rotavirus vaccination. Reported estimates reflect vaccination opportunities that mostly occurred before disruptions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Extra efforts are needed to ensure that children who missed vaccinations, including those attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic, receive them as soon as possible to maintain protection against vaccine-preventable illnesses.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Vaccines / Vaccination Coverage Limits: Humans / Infant Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Vaccines / Vaccination Coverage Limits: Humans / Infant Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article