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Predictors of Incident Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Positivity in a Veteran Population.
Smith, Jeremy; Aboumrad, Maya; Reyes, Carolina; Satram, Sacha; Young-Xu, Yinong.
  • Smith J; US Department of Veterans Affairs, Clinical Epidemiology Program, White River Jct, VT 05009, USA.
  • Aboumrad M; US Department of Veterans Affairs, Clinical Epidemiology Program, White River Jct, VT 05009, USA.
  • Reyes C; Division of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, VIR Biotechnology, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
  • Satram S; Division of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, VIR Biotechnology, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
  • Young-Xu Y; US Department of Veterans Affairs, Clinical Epidemiology Program, White River Jct, VT 05009, USA.
Mil Med ; 2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475819
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

We explored factors related to testing positive for severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to identify populations most at risk for this airborne pathogen.

METHODS:

Data were abstracted from the medical record database of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and from public sources. Veterans testing positive were matched in a 14 ratio to those at a similar timepoint and local disease burden who remained negative between March 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the association of each potential risk factor with a positive test result.

RESULTS:

A total of 24,843 veterans who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were matched with 99,324 controls. Cases and controls were similar in age, sex, ethnicity, and rurality, but cases were more likely to be Black, reside in low-income counties, and suffer from dementia. Multivariable analysis demonstrated highest risk for Black veterans, those with dementia or diabetes, and those living in nursing homes or high-poverty areas. Veterans living in counties likely to be more adherent to public health guidelines were at the lowest risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results are similar to those from studies of other populations and add to that work by accounting for several important proxies for risk. In particular, this work has implications for the value of infection control measures at the population level in helping to stem widespread outbreaks of this type.

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Clinical aspect: Etiology / Prediction / Prognosis Year: 2021

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Clinical aspect: Etiology / Prediction / Prognosis Year: 2021
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