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Implementing lateral flow devices in long-term care facilities: experiences from the Liverpool COVID-19 community testing pilot in care homes- a qualitative study.
Kierkegaard, Patrick; Micocci, Massimo; McLister, Anna; Tulloch, John S P; Parvulescu, Paula; Gordon, Adam L; Buckle, Peter.
  • Kierkegaard P; NIHR London In Vitro Diagnostics Co-operative, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY, UK. P.Kierkegaard@imperial.ac.uk.
  • Micocci M; CRUK Convergence Science Centre, Institute for Cancer Research & Imperial College London, Roderic Hill Building, South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. P.Kierkegaard@imperial.ac.uk.
  • McLister A; NIHR London In Vitro Diagnostics Co-operative, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY, UK.
  • Tulloch JSP; NIHR London In Vitro Diagnostics Co-operative, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY, UK.
  • Parvulescu P; Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, CH64 7TE, UK.
  • Gordon AL; Public Health Department, Liverpool City Council, Liverpool, Cunard Building, Water Street, Liverpool, L3 1DS, UK.
  • Buckle P; Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1153, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484313
ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:

Antigen-based lateral flow devices (LFDs) offer the potential of widespread rapid testing. The scientific literature has primarily focused on mathematical modelling of their use and test performance characteristics. For these tests to be implemented successfully, an understanding of the real-world contextual factors that allow them to be integrated into the workplace is vital. To address this gap in knowledge, we aimed to explore staff's experiences of integrating LFDs into routine practice for visitors and staff testing with a view to understand implementation facilitators and barriers.

METHODS:

Semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis.

RESULTS:

We identified two main themes and five subthemes. The main themes included visitor-related testing factors and staff-related testing factors. Subthemes included restoring a sense of normality, visitor-related testing challenges, staff-related testing challenges, and pre-pilot antecedent factors.

CONCLUSION:

Our study demonstrates that the real-world implementation of LFDs to test visitors and staff faces significant challenges as a result of several contextual factors negatively affecting the work practice and environment. More comprehensive studies are needed to identify and inform effective implementation strategies to ensure that LFDs can be adopted in an agile way that better supports an already exhausted and morally depleted workforce.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Long-Term Care / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: BMC Health Serv Res Journal subject: Health Services Research Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12913-021-07191-9

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Long-Term Care / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: BMC Health Serv Res Journal subject: Health Services Research Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12913-021-07191-9