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Frequency of Firearm Injuries to Head and Neck Increased During Covid-19 Pandemic.
Amin, Dina; Manhan, Andrew J; Smith, Randi N; Roser, Steven M; Abramowicz, Shelly.
  • Amin D; Assistant Professor in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine; Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Outpatient Clinic, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA. Electronic address: damin3@emory.edu.
  • Manhan AJ; Medical Student Researcher, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA.
  • Smith RN; Assistant Professor of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine; Assistant Professor of Public Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA.
  • Roser SM; DeLos Hill Chair and Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine Emory University; Chief of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA.
  • Abramowicz S; Associate Professor in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine; Chief of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 79(11): 2299-2305, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487859
ABSTRACT

PURPOSE:

During coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, hospitals faced challenges which were different than previous years. The purpose this study was to report frequency of firearm injuries (FI) to head and neck during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study reviewed patients in the Trauma Registry at Grady Memorial Hospital (GMH) in Atlanta, GA. Patients were included if they sustained FI to head and neck, were listed in TR, and were treated at GMH. Patients were stratified according to date of injury into 1) before COVID-19 pandemic, (BC19) or 2) during initial 5 months of COVID-19 pandemic, (C19). Variables were patient demographics, illegal substance use, etiology, place of injury, distressed communities index, location of injury, Glasgow Coma scale on arrival, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Emergency Department (ED), shock on admission, disposition from ED, length of stay, days on mechanical ventilation and discharge status. Descriptive, univariate, and bivariate analysis were completed. Chi square test was used for categorical variables. Statistical significance was P < .05.

RESULTS:

There were 215 patients who met inclusion criteria. There were 96 patients (78 males) with a mean age of 31.5 years old during BC19. There were 119 patients (101 males) with a mean age 32.7 years old during C19. There was a 10.4% increase in FI to head and neck during COVID-19. Our data showed that alcohol use was associated with FI during C19 (P≤ .0001). FI to base of skull occurred 34.5% more often during C19 (P = .002). Cranial injuries occurred 26% more often during BC19 (P = .03). During BC19, 85.4% of the patients arrived alive to GMH, but only 16% arrived alive during C19 (P ≤ .0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

There were more FI to head and neck during COVID-10 pandemic than during the previous time period.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Wounds, Gunshot / Firearms / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prevalence study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Oral Maxillofac Surg Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Wounds, Gunshot / Firearms / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prevalence study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Oral Maxillofac Surg Year: 2021 Document Type: Article