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How Do Polish Students Manage Emotional Distress during the COVID-19 Lockdown? A Web-Based Cross-Sectional Study.
Sitarz, Ryszard; Forma, Alicja; Karakula, Kaja; Juchnowicz, Dariusz; Baj, Jacek; Bogucki, Jacek; Karakula-Juchnowicz, Hanna.
  • Sitarz R; Chair and I Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Early Intervention, Medical University of Lublin, 20-439 Lublin, Poland.
  • Forma A; Psychiatry Student Research Group I Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Early Intervention, Medical University of Lublin, 20-439 Lublin, Poland.
  • Karakula K; Psychiatry Student Research Group I Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Early Intervention, Medical University of Lublin, 20-439 Lublin, Poland.
  • Juchnowicz D; Department of Psychiatric Nursing, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland.
  • Baj J; Chair and Department of Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-090 Lublin, Poland.
  • Bogucki J; Chair and Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Lublin, 20-093 Lublin, Poland.
  • Karakula-Juchnowicz H; Chair and I Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Early Intervention, Medical University of Lublin, 20-439 Lublin, Poland.
J Clin Med ; 10(21)2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488628
ABSTRACT
Choices regarding coping strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak may imply the development as well as the severity of emotional disorders. The aim of this web-based cross-sectional study was to (1) assess the coping strategies for stress in a population of Polish students and (2) evaluate the impact of those strategies on the severity of depression, stress, and anxiety symptoms during the COVID-19 lockdown. To evaluate emotional distress, we used the DASS-21 scale and coping strategies Brief-COPE Inventory. The study included 2172 respondents (73% female, 27% male) with a mean age of 22.1 ± 2.2. Students more frequently chose stress coping strategies belonging to the 'approach' coping strategies (M = 29.60 ± 6.89) compared to 'avoidant' coping strategies (M = 22.82 ± 5.78). The intensification of distress in women caused a turn to religion (p = 0.001), while men used substances (p < 0.001) and a sense of humor (p < 0.001). Medical students coped best with emotional distress, which is very encouraging for their future profession. The highest level of DASS total score was associated with the usage of avoidant coping strategies, prior use of psychiatric or psychological support, and loneliness. Planning interventions to prevent emotional disorders in students requires the identification of factors contributing to increased emotional distress.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jcm10214964

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jcm10214964