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The associations of previous influenza/upper respiratory infection with COVID-19 susceptibility/morbidity/mortality: a nationwide cohort study in South Korea.
Kim, So Young; Kim, Joo-Hee; Kim, Miyoung; Wee, Jee Hye; Jung, Younghee; Min, Chanyang; Yoo, Dae Myoung; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun.
  • Kim SY; Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.
  • Kim JH; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.
  • Kim M; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • Wee JH; Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • Jung Y; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea.
  • Min C; Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • Yoo DM; Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
  • Sim S; Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • Choi HG; School of Data Science, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21568, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500503
ABSTRACT
We aimed to investigate the associations of previous influenza/URI with the susceptibility of COVID-19 patients compared to that of non-COVID-19 participants. A nationwide COVID-19 cohort database was collected by the Korea National Health Insurance Corporation. A total of 8,070 COVID-19 patients (1 January 2020 through 4 June 2020) were matched with 32,280 control participants. Severe COVID-19 morbidity was defined based on the treatment histories of the intensive care unit, invasive ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and death. The susceptibility/morbidity/mortality associated with prior histories of 1-14, 1-30, 1-90, 15-45, 15-90, and 31-90 days before COVID-19 onset were analyzed using conditional/unconditional logistic regression. Prior influenza infection was related to increased susceptibility to COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 3.07 [1.61-5.85] for 1-14 days and 1.91 [1.54-2.37] for 1-90 days). Prior URI was also associated with increased susceptibility to COVID-19 (6.95 [6.38-7.58] for 1-14 days, 4.99 [4.64-5.37] for 1-30 days, and 2.70 [2.55-2.86] for 1-90 days). COVID-19 morbidity was positively associated with influenza (3.64 [1.55-9.21] and 3.59 [1.42-9.05]) and URI (1.40 [1.11-1.78] and 1.28 [1.02-1.61]) at 1-14 days and 1-30 days, respectively. Overall, previous influenza/URI did not show an association with COVID-19 mortality. Previous influenza/URI histories were associated with increased COVID-19 susceptibility and morbidity. Our findings indicate why controlling influenza/URI is important during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Humans / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Sci Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Humans / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Sci Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article