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Correlates of Neutralization against SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern by Early Pandemic Sera.
Vidal, Samuel J; Collier, Ai-Ris Y; Yu, Jingyou; McMahan, Katherine; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Ventura, John D; Aid, Malika; Peter, Lauren; Jacob-Dolan, Catherine; Anioke, Tochi; Chang, Aiquan; Wan, Huahua; Aguayo, Ricardo; Ngo, Debby; Gerszten, Robert E; Seaman, Michael S; Barouch, Dan H.
  • Vidal SJ; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Collier AY; Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Yu J; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • McMahan K; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Tostanoski LH; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Ventura JD; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Aid M; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Peter L; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Jacob-Dolan C; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Anioke T; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Chang A; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Wan H; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Aguayo R; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Ngo D; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Gerszten RE; Program in Immunology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Seaman MS; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Barouch DH; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
J Virol ; 95(14): e0040421, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501539
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Vaccines AUGMENTS Immune response
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
AUGMENTS
Object
Immune response
2. B variant NOS PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
B variant NOS
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
3. Vaccines AUGMENTS Immune response
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
AUGMENTS
Object
Immune response
4. B variant NOS PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
B variant NOS
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
ABSTRACT
Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern that overcome natural and vaccine-induced immunity threaten to exacerbate the COVID-19 pandemic. Increasing evidence suggests that neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are a primary mechanism of protection against infection. However, little is known about the extent and mechanisms by which natural immunity acquired during the early COVID-19 pandemic confers cross-neutralization of emerging variants. In this study, we investigated cross-neutralization of the B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 variants in a well-characterized cohort of early pandemic convalescent subjects. We observed modestly decreased cross-neutralization of B.1.1.7 but a substantial 4.8-fold reduction in cross-neutralization of B.1.351. Correlates of cross-neutralization included receptor binding domain (RBD) and N-terminal domain (NTD) binding antibodies, homologous NAb titers, and membrane-directed T cell responses. These data shed light on the cross-neutralization of emerging variants by early pandemic convalescent immune responses. IMPORTANCE Widespread immunity to SARS-CoV-2 will be necessary to end the COVID-19 pandemic. NAb responses are a critical component of immunity that can be stimulated by natural infection as well as vaccines. However, SARS-CoV-2 variants are emerging that contain mutations in the spike gene that promote evasion from NAb responses. These variants may therefore delay control of the COVID-19 pandemic. We studied whether NAb responses from early COVID-19 convalescent patients are effective against the two SARS-CoV-2 variants, B.1.1.7 and B.1.351. We observed that the B.1.351 variant demonstrates significantly reduced susceptibility to early pandemic NAb responses. We additionally characterized virological, immunological, and clinical features that correlate with cross-neutralization. These studies increase our understanding of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Pandemics / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Adult / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Virol Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jvi.00404-21

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Pandemics / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Adult / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Virol Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jvi.00404-21