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Risk factors and predictors that influence SARS-Cov-2 IgG positivity: A cross-sectional study of blood donors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Alosaimi, Mohammed F; Alhetheel, Abdulkarim; Aleisa, Khalid A; Altwerki, Abdullah A; Alenezy, Njoud M; Almutairi, Ebtisam M; Alothaim, Leen O; Khalid, Abdul Manan A; Alayed, Khalid M; Almazyad, Mohammed A; BinMoammar, Turki A; Alshobaili, Fahdah A; Al-Shahrani, Fatimah S; Alsubaie, Sarah; Hasanato, Rana M.
  • Alosaimi MF; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alhetheel A; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Aleisa KA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Altwerki AA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alenezy NM; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Almutairi EM; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alothaim LO; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Khalid AMA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alayed KM; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Almazyad MA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • BinMoammar TA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alshobaili FA; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Al-Shahrani FS; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Alsubaie S; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
  • Hasanato RM; From the Department of Pediatrics (Alosaimi, Almazyad), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the College of Medicine Research Center (Alosaimi), King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Saudi Med J ; 42(8): 853-861, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513262
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

To study the prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) after pandemic's peak and before the vaccine enrollment in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and further explore predictors for SARS-CoV-2 positivity.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study of 515 blood donors from November 22 to December 17, 2020 was conducted at King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to look at SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) positivity. The participants were asked questions about their demographic characteristics, past SARS-CoV-2 infection, SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms and exposures.

RESULTS:

The seroprevalence in our study was 12.2% (n=63/515). Being a non-citizen was associated with significantly higher seroprevalence (OR 2.10, p=0.02). Participants with history of SARS-CoV-2 exposure or symptoms regardless of SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis had higher SARS-CoV-2 IgG positivity compared to unexposed or asymptomatic participants (OR 2.47, p=0.0008 or 11.19, p=0.0001, respectively). Blood donors who had symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 IgG infection had a higher SARS-CoV-2 IgG positivity rate (OR 5.04, p=0.008) and index value (p=0.003) than the asymptomatic. Of all the reported symptoms, cough (p=0.004) and anosmia (p=0.002) were significant predictors of SARS-CoV-2 IgG.

CONCLUSION:

The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 among the blood donors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia is considerably lower than the percentages necessary for herd immunity. Developing SARS-CoV-2-symptoms is the critical factor for higher seropositivity after SARS-CoV-2 exposure.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Humans Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Saudi Med J Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Humans Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Saudi Med J Year: 2021 Document Type: Article