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Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Adults after SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination.
Belay, Ermias D; Godfred Cato, Shana; Rao, Agam K; Abrams, Joseph; Wilson, W Wyatt; Lim, Sarah; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Melgar, Michael; DeCuir, Jennifer; Webb, Brandon; Marquez, Paige; Su, John R; Meng, Lu; Grome, Heather N; Schlaudecker, Elizabeth; Talaat, Kawsar; Edwards, Kathryn; Barnett, Elizabeth; Campbell, Angela P; Broder, Karen R; Bamrah Morris, Sapna.
  • Belay ED; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Godfred Cato S; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Rao AK; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Abrams J; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Wilson WW; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Lim S; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Newton-Cheh C; Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul, Minnesota, USA.
  • Melgar M; Massachusetts General Hospital, Cardiovascular Research Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • DeCuir J; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Webb B; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Marquez P; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Su JR; Intermountain Healthcare, Murray, Utah, USA.
  • Meng L; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Grome HN; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Schlaudecker E; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Talaat K; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Edwards K; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
  • Barnett E; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • Campbell AP; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Broder KR; Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Bamrah Morris S; COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545912
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) was reported in association with the COVID-19 pandemic. MIS-A was included in the list of adverse events to be monitored as part of the emergency use authorizations issued for COVID-19 vaccines.

METHODS:

Reports of MIS-A patients received by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after COVID-19 vaccines became available were assessed. Data collected on the patients included clinical and demographic characteristics and their vaccine status. The Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) was also reviewed for possible cases of MIS-A.

RESULTS:

From December 14, 2020 to April 30, 2021, 20 patients who met the case definition for MIS-A were reported to CDC. Their median age was 35 years (range, 21-66 years), and 13 (65%) were male. Overall, 16 (80%) patients had a preceding COVID-19-like illness a median of 26 days (range 11-78 days) before MIS-A onset. All 20 patients had laboratory evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Seven MIS-A patients (35%) received COVID-19 vaccine a median of 10 days (range, 6-45 days) before MIS-A onset; 3 patients received a second dose of COVID-19 vaccine 4, 17, and 22 days before MIS-A onset. Patients with MIS-A predominantly had gastrointestinal and cardiac manifestations and hypotension or shock.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although 7 patients were reported to have received COVID-19 vaccine, all had evidence of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. Given the widespread use of COVID-19 vaccines, the lack of reporting of MIS-A associated with vaccination alone, without evidence of underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection, is reassuring.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Cid

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Cid