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COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in people with migratory backgrounds: a cross-sectional study among Turkish- and German-speaking citizens in Munich.
Aktürk, Zekeriya; Linde, Klaus; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Kunisch, Raphael; Schneider, Antonius.
  • Aktürk Z; Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Orleansstr. 47, 81667, Munich, Germany. zekeriya.aktuerk@tum.de.
  • Linde K; Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Orleansstr. 47, 81667, Munich, Germany.
  • Hapfelmeier A; Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Orleansstr. 47, 81667, Munich, Germany.
  • Kunisch R; Institute for AI and Medical Informatics in Medicine, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
  • Schneider A; Institute of General Practice, School of Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1214, 2021 Dec 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555054
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy of people with migratory backgrounds among Turkish- and German-speaking patients in Munich.

METHODS:

Primary outcomes were the intention to get vaccinated for COVID-19 and COVID-19 knowledge levels (25 true/false items). Other variables included demographics, attitudes to COVID-19 and vaccination (7 items), and behaviors regarding COVID-19 (7 items). The attitude and behavior questions had 5-point Likert scales. Of the 10 Turkish-speaking family physicians in Munich, six agreed to administer Turkish or German questionnaires to consecutive patients in February 2021. Furthermore, participants with either citizenship, country of origin, native language, or place of birth being non-German were categorized as "Having a migratory background." Data from 420 respondents were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Women constituted 41.4% (n = 174), the mean age was 42.2 ± 15.5 years, 245 (58.3%) preferred the Turkish questionnaire, 348 (82.9%) had a migratory background, and 197 (47.9%) intended to be vaccinated. The mean knowledge, attitude, and behavioral scores were 21.5 ± 3.2 (max = 25), 3.7 ± 0.8 (max = 5), and 4.0 ± 0.5 (max = 5). While 42.3% (n = 145) of the participants with a migratory background considered getting vaccinated, this proportion was 76.5% (n = 52) for non-immigrant Germans (Chi-square = 26.818, p < 0.001). Non-migratory background (odds ratio (OR) 3.082), high attitude scores (OR 2.877), male sex (OR 2.185), years of schooling (OR 1.064), and age (OR 1.022) were positively associated with vaccination intention.

CONCLUSIONS:

We suggest initiating or supporting projects run by persons or groups with immigrant backgrounds to attempt to elaborate and change their vaccination attitudes.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 Type of study: Prevalence study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: BMC Infect Dis Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12879-021-06940-9

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 Type of study: Prevalence study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: BMC Infect Dis Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S12879-021-06940-9