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Effectiveness of a Videoconferencing-Delivered Psychological Intervention for Mental Health Problems during COVID-19: A Proof-of-Concept Randomized Clinical Trial.
Bryant, Richard A; Dawson, Katie S; Keyan, Dharani; Azevedo, Suzanna; Yadav, Srishti; Tran, Jenny; Rawson, Natasha; Harvey, Samuel.
  • Bryant RA; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Dawson KS; Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Keyan D; Black Dog Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Azevedo S; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Yadav S; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Tran J; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Rawson N; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Harvey S; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Psychother Psychosom ; 91(1): 63-72, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556865
ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:

Anxiety and depression have increased markedly during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a lack of evidence-based strategies to address these mental health needs during the pandemic.

OBJECTIVE:

We aim to conduct a proof-of-concept trial of the efficacy of a brief group-based psychological intervention delivered via videoconferencing for adults in Australia distressed by the pandemic.

METHODS:

In this single-blind, parallel, randomised controlled trial, adults who screened positive for COVID-related psychological distress across Australia were randomly allocated to either a 6-session group-based program based on behavioural principles (n = 120) or enhanced usual care (EUC, n = 120). Primary outcome was total score on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HADS) anxiety and depression subscales assessed at baseline, 1 week posttreatment, 2 months (primary outcome time point), and 6 months after treatment, as well as secondary outcome measures of worry, sleep impairment, anhedonia, mood, and COVID-19-related stress.

RESULTS:

Between May 20, 2020, and October 20, 2020, 240 patients were enrolled into the trial. Relative to EUC, at 2 months participants receiving intervention showed greater reduction on anxiety (mean difference, 1.4 [95% CI, 0.3 to 2.6], p = 0.01; effect size, 0.4 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.7]) and depression (mean difference, 1.6 [95% CI, 0.4 to 2.8], p = 0.009; effect size, 0.4 [95% CI, 0.2 to 0.7]) scales. These effects were maintained at 6 months. There were also greater reductions of worry, anhedonia, COVID-19-related fears, and contamination fears.

CONCLUSIONS:

This trial provides initial evidence that brief group-based behavioural intervention delivered via videoconferencing results in moderate reductions in common psychological problems arising during the COVID-19 pandemic. This program may offer a viable and scalable means to mitigate the rising mental health problems during the pandemic.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Humans Language: English Journal: Psychother Psychosom Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 000520283

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Humans Language: English Journal: Psychother Psychosom Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 000520283