Your browser doesn't support javascript.
SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among People Living With HIV Compared With People Without HIV: Survey Results From the MACS-WIHS Combined Cohort Study.
D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Tong, Weiqun; Gustafson, Deborah; Alcaide, Maria L; Lahiri, Cecile D; Sharma, Anjali; French, Audrey L; Palella, Frank J; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Ramirez, Catalina; Kassaye, Seble; Rinaldo, Charles R; Brown, Todd T; Tien, Phyllis C; Adimora, Adaora A.
  • D'Souza G; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
  • Tong W; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
  • Gustafson D; Department of Neurology, State of New York Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, NY.
  • Alcaide ML; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.
  • Lahiri CD; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.
  • Sharma A; Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.
  • French AL; Department of Medicine, CORE Center/Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago IL.
  • Palella FJ; Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
  • Kempf MC; Schools of Nursing, Public Health and Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.
  • Mimiaga MJ; Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Ramirez C; Department of Medicine, UNC School Division of Medicine, The Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
  • Kassaye S; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.
  • Rinaldo CR; Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Brown TT; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
  • Tien PC; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Department of Veterans Affairs, San Francisco, CA.
  • Adimora AA; Department of Epidemiology, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 89(1): 1-8, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561815
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms among people living with HIV (PLWH) are not well described.

SETTING:

Longitudinal survey within the MACS/WIHS Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS) of PLWH compared with similar HIV-seronegative (SN) individuals.

METHODS:

Telephone-administered survey of MWCCS participants at 13 clinical research sites across the United States addressing COVID-19 symptoms, SARS-CoV-2 testing, and pandemic impact on social distancing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use. Primary data collection occurred during May (wave 1), June-July (wave 2), and August-September, 2020 (wave 3).

RESULTS:

One-third of MWCCS participants were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection; 10% was tested ≥2 times. Similar proportions of PLWH and SN participants were tested, but SARS-CoV-2 positivity was higher among PLWH than among SN individuals (9.4% vs 4.8%, P = 0.003). Odds of SARS-CoV-2 positivity remained higher among PLWH after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and study site (adjusted odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.2 to 3.2). SARS-CoV-2 positivity was not associated with CD4 cell counts among PLWH. Among SARS-CoV-2 positive participants, 9% had no symptoms, 7% had 1-2 mild symptoms, and 84% had ≥3 symptoms. Most of the (98%) participants reported physical distancing during all survey waves; self-reported ART adherence among PLWH was not adversely affected during the pandemic compared with the previous year (similar adherence in 89% of participants, improved in 9% of participants, and decreased in 2% of participants).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite similar SARS-CoV-2 testing and physical distancing profiles by HIV serostatus among MWCCS participants, PLWH who reported SARS-CoV-2 testing were more likely to have a positive test result. Additional studies are needed to determine whether and why PLWH are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pharyngitis / HIV Infections / Fever / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Prevalence study / Risk factors Limits: Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Journal subject: SINDROME DA IMUNODEFICIENCIA ADQUIRIDA (AIDS) Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: QAI.0000000000002822

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pharyngitis / HIV Infections / Fever / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Prevalence study / Risk factors Limits: Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Journal subject: SINDROME DA IMUNODEFICIENCIA ADQUIRIDA (AIDS) Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: QAI.0000000000002822