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COVID-19 pandemic and its psychological impact among healthy Portuguese and Spanish nursing students
Health psychology research ; 9(1), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661223
ABSTRACT
Few studies have explored the impacts of COVID-19 and lockdown on the mental health of undergraduate nursing students. This study aimed a) to explore perceived stress among undergraduate nursing students in Portugal and Spain during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak;and b) to analyze several COVID-19 related factors and psychological issues that may be associated with perceived stress. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of Portuguese and Spanish undergraduate nursing students (n=1075). The data gathered included demographic information, questions about COVID-19 related factors, and psychological issues. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression with a degree of significance at p<0.05. High perceived stress scores were found in 558 participants (51.9%). Students with high perceived stress most likely had a COVID-19 diagnosis in their household;their household income had been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic;experienced difficulty falling asleep or sleeping all night;consumed junk food in excess;neglected their appearance;felt headaches, stomach aches, and back pain;and lacked the patience or desire to exercise. Additionally, high perceived stress was negatively associated with life satisfaction. The results provide evidence that infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, may significantly influence mental health. Further research should explore the long-term psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic among nursing students.
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Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: EuropePMC Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Health psychology research Year: 2021 Document Type: Article
Search on Google
Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: EuropePMC Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Health psychology research Year: 2021 Document Type: Article