Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Patterns of Suicide in the Context of COVID-19: Evidence From Three Australian States.
Clapperton, Angela; Spittal, Matthew John; Dwyer, Jeremy; Garrett, Andrew; Kõlves, Kairi; Leske, Stuart; Millar, Ciara; Edwards, Bronwen; Stojcevski, Victor; Crompton, David Robert; Pirkis, Jane.
  • Clapperton A; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC, Australia.
  • Spittal MJ; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC, Australia.
  • Dwyer J; Coroners Prevention Unit, Coroners Court of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
  • Garrett A; Coronial Division, Magistrates Court of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia.
  • Kõlves K; Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention, School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
  • Leske S; Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention, School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
  • Millar C; Coroners Prevention Unit, Coroners Court of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
  • Edwards B; Roses in the Ocean, Newstead, QLD, Australia.
  • Stojcevski V; Coronial Division, Magistrates Court of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia.
  • Crompton DR; Australian Institute for Suicide Research and Prevention, School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
  • Pirkis J; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC, Australia.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 797601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581142
ABSTRACT

Aims:

We aimed to determine whether there has been a change in the number of suicides occurring in three Australian states overall, and in age and sex subgroups, since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and to see if certain risk factors for suicide have become more prominent as likely underlying contributing factors for suicide.

Method:

Using real-time data from three state-based suicide registers, we ran multiple unadjusted and adjusted interrupted time series analyses to see if trends in monthly suicide counts changed after the pandemic began and whether there had been an increase in suicides where relationship breakdown, financial stressors, unemployment and homelessness were recorded.

Results:

Compared with the period before COVID-19, during the COVID-19 period there was no change in the number of suicides overall, or in any stratum-specific estimates except one. The exception was an increase in the number of young males who died by suicide in the COVID-19 period (adjusted RR 1.89 [95% CI 1.11-3.23]). The unadjusted analysis showed significant differences in suicide in the context of unemployment and relationship breakdown during the COVID-19 compared to the pre-COVID-19 period. Analysis showed an increase in the number of suicides occurring in the context of unemployment in the COVID-19 period (unadjusted RR 1.53 [95% CI 1.18-1.96]). In contrast, there was a decrease in the number of suicides occurring in the context of relationship breakdown in the COVID-19 period (unadjusted RR 0.82 [95% CI 0.67-0.99]). However, no significant changes were identified when the models were adjusted for possible over-dispersion, seasonality and non-linear trend.

Conclusion:

Although our analysis found no evidence of an overall increase in suicides after the pandemic began, the picture is complex. The identified increase in suicide in young men indicates that the impact of the pandemic is likely unevenly distributed across populations. The increase in suicides in the context of unemployment reinforces the vital need for mitigation measures during COVID-19, and for ongoing monitoring of suicide as the pandemic continues.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Evidence synthesis / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Front Psychiatry Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Fpsyt.2021.797601

Similar

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS


Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Evidence synthesis / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Front Psychiatry Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Fpsyt.2021.797601