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Children develop robust and sustained cross-reactive spike-specific immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Dowell, Alexander C; Butler, Megan S; Jinks, Elizabeth; Tut, Gokhan; Lancaster, Tara; Sylla, Panagiota; Begum, Jusnara; Bruton, Rachel; Pearce, Hayden; Verma, Kriti; Logan, Nicola; Tyson, Grace; Spalkova, Eliska; Margielewska-Davies, Sandra; Taylor, Graham S; Syrimi, Eleni; Baawuah, Frances; Beckmann, Joanne; Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Ahmad, Shazaad; Garstang, Joanna; Brent, Andrew J; Brent, Bernadette; Ireland, Georgina; Aiano, Felicity; Amin-Chowdhury, Zahin; Jones, Samuel; Borrow, Ray; Linley, Ezra; Wright, John; Azad, Rafaq; Waiblinger, Dagmar; Davis, Chris; Thomson, Emma C; Palmarini, Massimo; Willett, Brian J; Barclay, Wendy S; Poh, John; Amirthalingam, Gayatri; Brown, Kevin E; Ramsay, Mary E; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul; Ladhani, Shamez.
  • Dowell AC; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Butler MS; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Jinks E; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Tut G; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Lancaster T; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Sylla P; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Begum J; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Bruton R; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Pearce H; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Verma K; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Logan N; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Tyson G; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Spalkova E; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Margielewska-Davies S; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Taylor GS; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Syrimi E; Institute of Immunology & Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Baawuah F; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Beckmann J; East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
  • Okike IO; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Ahmad S; University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, Derby, UK.
  • Garstang J; Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
  • Brent AJ; Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust, Aston, UK.
  • Brent B; Institute of Applied Health Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Ireland G; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Aiano F; University of Oxford, Wellington Square, Oxford, UK.
  • Amin-Chowdhury Z; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Jones S; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Borrow R; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Linley E; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Wright J; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Azad R; Public Health England, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK.
  • Waiblinger D; Public Health England, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK.
  • Davis C; Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK.
  • Thomson EC; Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK.
  • Palmarini M; Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK.
  • Willett BJ; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Barclay WS; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Poh J; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Amirthalingam G; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Brown KE; Department of Infectious Disease, Imperial College, London, UK.
  • Ramsay ME; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Zuo J; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Moss P; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
  • Ladhani S; Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, UK.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 40-49, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585824
ABSTRACT
SARS-CoV-2 infection is generally mild or asymptomatic in children but a biological basis for this outcome is unclear. Here we compare antibody and cellular immunity in children (aged 3-11 years) and adults. Antibody responses against spike protein were high in children and seroconversion boosted responses against seasonal Beta-coronaviruses through cross-recognition of the S2 domain. Neutralization of viral variants was comparable between children and adults. Spike-specific T cell responses were more than twice as high in children and were also detected in many seronegative children, indicating pre-existing cross-reactive responses to seasonal coronaviruses. Importantly, children retained antibody and cellular responses 6 months after infection, whereas relative waning occurred in adults. Spike-specific responses were also broadly stable beyond 12 months. Therefore, children generate robust, cross-reactive and sustained immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 with focused specificity for the spike protein. These findings provide insight into the relative clinical protection that occurs in most children and might help to guide the design of pediatric vaccination regimens.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Coronavirus 229E, Human / Coronavirus OC43, Human / Cross Protection / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / SARS-CoV-2 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Adult / Child / Child, preschool / Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Immunol Journal subject: Allergy and Immunology Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41590-021-01089-8

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Coronavirus 229E, Human / Coronavirus OC43, Human / Cross Protection / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / SARS-CoV-2 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Adult / Child / Child, preschool / Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Immunol Journal subject: Allergy and Immunology Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41590-021-01089-8