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Integrating Principles of Safety Culture and Just Culture Into Nursing Homes: Lessons From the Pandemic.
Gaur, Swati; Kumar, Rajeev; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Jump, Robin L P.
  • Gaur S; New Horizons Nursing Facilities, Gainesville, GA, USA.
  • Kumar R; Symbria, Warrenville, IL, USA; Humana I-SNP, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • Gillespie SM; Geriatrics, Extended Care & Rehabilitation, VA Finger Lakes Healthcare System, Bath, NY, USA; Division of Geriatrics & Aging, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.
  • Jump RLP; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, OH, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, Department of Medicine and the Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(2): 241-246, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587370
ABSTRACT
Decades of concerns about the quality of care provided by nursing homes have led state and federal agencies to create layers of regulations and penalties. As such, regulatory efforts to improve nursing home care have largely focused on the identification of deficiencies and assignment of sanctions. The current regulatory strategy often places nursing home teams and government agencies at odds, hindering their ability to build a culture of safety in nursing homes that is foundational to health care quality. Imbuing safety culture into nursing homes will require nursing homes and regulatory agencies to acknowledge the high-risk nature of post-acute and long-term care settings, embrace just culture, and engage nursing home staff and stakeholders in actions that are supported by evidence-based best practices. The response to the COVID-19 pandemic prompted some of these actions, leading to changes in nursing survey and certification processes as well as deployment of strike teams to support nursing homes in crisis. These actions, coupled with investments in public health that include funds earmarked for nursing homes, could become the initial phases of an intentional renovation of the existing regulatory oversight from one that is largely punitive to one that is rooted in safety culture and proactively designed to achieve meaningful and sustained improvements in the quality of care and life for nursing home residents.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J Am Med Dir Assoc Journal subject: History of Medicine / Medicine Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.jamda.2021.12.017

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J Am Med Dir Assoc Journal subject: History of Medicine / Medicine Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.jamda.2021.12.017