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Omicron extensively but incompletely escapes Pfizer BNT162b2 neutralization.
Cele, Sandile; Jackson, Laurelle; Khoury, David S; Khan, Khadija; Moyo-Gwete, Thandeka; Tegally, Houriiyah; San, James Emmanuel; Cromer, Deborah; Scheepers, Cathrine; Amoako, Daniel G; Karim, Farina; Bernstein, Mallory; Lustig, Gila; Archary, Derseree; Smith, Muneerah; Ganga, Yashica; Jule, Zesuliwe; Reedoy, Kajal; Hwa, Shi-Hsia; Giandhari, Jennifer; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Gosnell, Bernadett I; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Hanekom, Willem; von Gottberg, Anne; Bhiman, Jinal N; Lessells, Richard J; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Davenport, Miles P; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moore, Penny L; Sigal, Alex.
  • Cele S; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Jackson L; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Khoury DS; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Khan K; Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Moyo-Gwete T; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Tegally H; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • San JE; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Cromer D; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Scheepers C; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform, Durban, South Africa.
  • Amoako DG; Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation, School of Data Science and Computational Thinking, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
  • Karim F; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform, Durban, South Africa.
  • Bernstein M; Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Lustig G; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Archary D; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Smith M; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Ganga Y; National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Jule Z; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Reedoy K; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Hwa SH; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Giandhari J; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Durban, South Africa.
  • Blackburn JM; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Durban, South Africa.
  • Gosnell BI; Department of Medical Microbiology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Abdool Karim SS; Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Hanekom W; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • von Gottberg A; Africa Health Research Institute, Durban, South Africa.
  • Bhiman JN; Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, UK.
  • Lessells RJ; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform, Durban, South Africa.
  • Moosa MS; Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Davenport MP; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • de Oliveira T; Department of Infectious Diseases, Nelson R. Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
  • Moore PL; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Durban, South Africa.
  • Sigal A; Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
Nature ; 602(7898): 654-656, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616992
ABSTRACT
The emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern Omicron (Pango lineage B.1.1.529), first identified in Botswana and South Africa, may compromise vaccine effectiveness and lead to re-infections1. Here we investigated Omicron escape from neutralization by antibodies from South African individuals vaccinated with Pfizer BNT162b2. We used blood samples taken soon after vaccination from individuals who were vaccinated and previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 or vaccinated with no evidence of previous infection. We isolated and sequence-confirmed live Omicron virus from an infected person and observed that Omicron requires the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor to infect cells. We compared plasma neutralization of Omicron relative to an ancestral SARS-CoV-2 strain and found that neutralization of ancestral virus was much higher in infected and vaccinated individuals compared with the vaccinated-only participants. However, both groups showed a 22-fold reduction in vaccine-elicited neutralization by the Omicron variant. Participants who were vaccinated and had previously been infected exhibited residual neutralization of Omicron similar to the level of neutralization of the ancestral virus observed in the vaccination-only group. These data support the notion that reasonable protection against Omicron may be maintained using vaccination approaches.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Neutralization Tests / Antibodies, Neutralizing / Immune Evasion / SARS-CoV-2 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Journal: Nature Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41586-021-04387-1

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Neutralization Tests / Antibodies, Neutralizing / Immune Evasion / SARS-CoV-2 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Journal: Nature Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41586-021-04387-1