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Surviving SARS and living through COVID-19: Healthcare worker mental health outcomes and insights for coping.
Styra, Rima; Hawryluck, Laura; Mc Geer, Allison; Dimas, Michelle; Sheen, Jack; Giacobbe, Peter; Dattani, Neil; Lorello, Gianni; Rac, Valeria E; Francis, Troy; Wu, Peter E; Luk, Wing-Si; Ng, Enoch; Nadarajah, Jeya; Wingrove, Kaila; Gold, Wayne L.
  • Styra R; Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Hawryluck L; Intensive Care Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Mc Geer A; Division of Infectious Diseases, Sinai Health System & University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Dimas M; Department of Research, William Osler Health System, Brampton, Ontario, Canada.
  • Sheen J; Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Giacobbe P; Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Dattani N; Department of Emergency Medicine, William Osler Health System, Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.
  • Lorello G; Department of Anesthesia, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Rac VE; Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Francis T; Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) Collaborative, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Wu PE; Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) Collaborative, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Luk WS; Division of General Internal Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Ng E; Patient Safety & Quality Improvement, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Nadarajah J; Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Wingrove K; Infectious Disease, Markham Stouffville Hospital, Markham, Ontario, Canada.
  • Gold WL; Intensive Care Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700707
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9).

RESULTS:

Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Health Personnel / Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome / COVID-19 Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Prevalence study / Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: PLoS One Journal subject: Science / Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Journal.pone.0258893

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Health Personnel / Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome / COVID-19 Type of study: Controlled clinical trial / Prevalence study / Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: PLoS One Journal subject: Science / Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Journal.pone.0258893