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Divergent trajectories of antiviral memory after SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Tomic, Adriana; Skelly, Donal T; Ogbe, Ane; O'Connor, Daniel; Pace, Matthew; Adland, Emily; Alexander, Frances; Ali, Mohammad; Allott, Kirk; Azim Ansari, M; Belij-Rammerstorfer, Sandra; Bibi, Sagida; Blackwell, Luke; Brown, Anthony; Brown, Helen; Cavell, Breeze; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; de Silva, Thushan; Eyre, David; Lumley, Sheila; Flaxman, Amy; Grist, James; Hackstein, Carl-Philipp; Halkerston, Rachel; Harding, Adam C; Hill, Jennifer; James, Tim; Jay, Cecilia; Johnson, Síle A; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Lie, Yolanda; Linder, Aline; Longet, Stephanie; Marinou, Spyridoula; Matthews, Philippa C; Mellors, Jack; Petropoulos, Christos; Rongkard, Patpong; Sedik, Cynthia; Silva-Reyes, Laura; Smith, Holly; Stockdale, Lisa; Taylor, Stephen; Thomas, Stephen; Tipoe, Timothy; Turtle, Lance; Vieira, Vinicius Adriano; Wrin, Terri; Pollard, Andrew J; Lambe, Teresa.
  • Tomic A; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. info@adrianatomic.com.
  • Skelly DT; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Ogbe A; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • O'Connor D; Nuffield Dept of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Pace M; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Adland E; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Alexander F; NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK.
  • Ali M; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Allott K; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Azim Ansari M; United Kingdom Health Security Agency, Porton Down, Wiltshire, England.
  • Belij-Rammerstorfer S; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Bibi S; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Blackwell L; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Brown A; Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Brown H; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Cavell B; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Clutterbuck EA; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • de Silva T; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Eyre D; United Kingdom Health Security Agency, Porton Down, Wiltshire, England.
  • Lumley S; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Flaxman A; The Florey Institute for Host-Pathogen Interactions and Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, Medical School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
  • Grist J; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Hackstein CP; Big Data Institute, Nuffield Dept. of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Halkerston R; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Harding AC; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Hill J; Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • James T; Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Jay C; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Johnson SA; United Kingdom Health Security Agency, Porton Down, Wiltshire, England.
  • Kronsteiner B; James & Lillian Martin Centre, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Lie Y; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Linder A; NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK.
  • Longet S; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Marinou S; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Matthews PC; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Mellors J; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Petropoulos C; Oxford University Medical School, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Rongkard P; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Sedik C; Oxford Centre For Global Health Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Silva-Reyes L; Monogram Biosciences LabCorp, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Smith H; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Stockdale L; NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK.
  • Taylor S; United Kingdom Health Security Agency, Porton Down, Wiltshire, England.
  • Thomas S; Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Tipoe T; Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Turtle L; NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, UK.
  • Vieira VA; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Wrin T; Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
  • Pollard AJ; Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Dept. of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • Lambe T; Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 1251, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740439
ABSTRACT
The trajectories of acquired immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection are not fully understood. We present a detailed longitudinal cohort study of UK healthcare workers prior to vaccination, presenting April-June 2020 with asymptomatic or symptomatic infection. Here we show a highly variable range of responses, some of which (T cell interferon-gamma ELISpot, N-specific antibody) wane over time, while others (spike-specific antibody, B cell memory ELISpot) are stable. We use integrative analysis and a machine-learning approach (SIMON - Sequential Iterative Modeling OverNight) to explore this heterogeneity. We identify a subgroup of participants with higher antibody responses and interferon-gamma ELISpot T cell responses, and a robust trajectory for longer term immunity associates with higher levels of neutralising antibodies against the infecting (Victoria) strain and also against variants B.1.1.7 (alpha) and B.1.351 (beta). These variable trajectories following early priming may define subsequent protection from severe disease from novel variants.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Commun Journal subject: Biology / Science Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41467-022-28898-1

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Commun Journal subject: Biology / Science Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41467-022-28898-1