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Making Waves: Coronavirus detection, presence and persistence in the water environment: State of the art and knowledge needs for public health.
Water Res ; 179: 115907, 2020 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-175680
ABSTRACT
The main route of transmission of the human coronaviruses (HCoVs), and presumably also of the new pandemic SARS-CoV-2, is via droplets and close contacts, however their fecal elimination also suggests the possible spread via water. A scientific literature search was thus carried out to highlight the current state of the art and knowledge gaps regarding coronavirus in water. Since 1978 only 22 studies have met the inclusion criteria, and considered heterogeneous purposes, detection methods and types of water. In vitro experiments have addressed the recovery efficiency of analytical methods, survival in different types of water and the removal efficiency of water treatments. Field studies have monitored coronaviruses in surface waters, sewage, slurry, and biosolids. Overall, at the lab scale, HCoVs or surrogates can survive for several days at 4 °C, however their persistence is lower compared with non-enveloped viruses and is strongly influenced by temperature and organic or microbial pollution. HCoVs have rarely been detected in field investigations, however may be due to the low recovery efficiency of the analytical methods. The scarcity of information on HCoV in the environment suggests that research is needed to understand the fate of these viruses in the water cycle.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type: Article Main subject: Coronavirus Infections / Coronavirus Subject: Coronavirus Infections / Coronavirus Type of study: Diagnostic study Language: English Journal: Water Res Year: 2020

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type: Article Main subject: Coronavirus Infections / Coronavirus Subject: Coronavirus Infections / Coronavirus Type of study: Diagnostic study Language: English Journal: Water Res Year: 2020