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Emergence and phenotypic characterization of the global SARS-CoV-2 C.1.2 lineage.
Scheepers, Cathrine; Everatt, Josie; Amoako, Daniel G; Tegally, Houriiyah; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Mnguni, Anele; Ismail, Arshad; Mahlangu, Boitshoko; Lambson, Bronwen E; Martin, Darren P; Wilkinson, Eduan; San, James Emmanuel; Giandhari, Jennifer; Manamela, Nelia; Ntuli, Noxolo; Kgagudi, Prudence; Cele, Sandile; Richardson, Simone I; Pillay, Sureshnee; Mohale, Thabo; Ramphal, Upasana; Naidoo, Yeshnee; Khumalo, Zamantungwa T; Kwatra, Gaurav; Gray, Glenda; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Madhi, Shabir A; Baillie, Vicky; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Treurnicht, Florette K; Venter, Marietjie; Mlisana, Koleka; Wolter, Nicole; Sigal, Alex; Williamson, Carolyn; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Msomi, Nokukhanya; Maponga, Tongai; Preiser, Wolfgang; Makatini, Zinhle; Lessells, Richard; Moore, Penny L; de Oliveira, Tulio; von Gottberg, Anne; Bhiman, Jinal N.
  • Scheepers C; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Everatt J; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2132, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Amoako DG; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Tegally H; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Wibmer CK; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Mnguni A; Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation (CERI), School of Data Science and Computational Thinking, Stellenbosch University, 7600, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
  • Ismail A; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Mahlangu B; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Lambson BE; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Martin DP; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Wilkinson E; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • San JE; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2132, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Giandhari J; Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, 7925, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Manamela N; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Ntuli N; Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation (CERI), School of Data Science and Computational Thinking, Stellenbosch University, 7600, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
  • Kgagudi P; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Cele S; Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation (CERI), School of Data Science and Computational Thinking, Stellenbosch University, 7600, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
  • Richardson SI; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Pillay S; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Mohale T; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2132, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Ramphal U; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Naidoo Y; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Khumalo ZT; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2132, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Kwatra G; Africa Health Research Institute, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Gray G; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4041, Durban, South Africa.
  • Bekker LG; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Madhi SA; SA MRC Antibody Immunity Research Unit, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2132, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Baillie V; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Van Voorhis WC; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Treurnicht FK; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Venter M; KwaZulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing Platform (KRISP), Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4001, Durban, South Africa.
  • Mlisana K; Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation (CERI), School of Data Science and Computational Thinking, Stellenbosch University, 7600, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
  • Wolter N; National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Sigal A; Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, 0110, Onderstepoort, South Africa.
  • Williamson C; South African Medical Research Council Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Analytics Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, 2000, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Hsiao NY; Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, 632004, India.
  • Msomi N; South African Medical Research Council, 7505, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Maponga T; Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, 7925, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • Preiser W; South African Medical Research Council Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Analytics Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, 2000, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Makatini Z; South African Medical Research Council Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Analytics Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, 2000, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • Lessells R; Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (CERID), University of Washington, Washington, 98195, USA.
  • Moore PL; National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), 2131, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • de Oliveira T; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 2193, Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • von Gottberg A; Zoonotic Arbo and Respiratory Virus Research Programme, Department of Medical Virology, Faculty of Health, University of Pretoria, 0031, Gezina, South Africa.
  • Bhiman JN; School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 4041, Durban, South Africa.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 1976, 2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783980
ABSTRACT
Global genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 has identified variants associated with increased transmissibility, neutralization resistance and disease severity. Here we report the emergence of the PANGO lineage C.1.2, detected at low prevalence in South Africa and eleven other countries. The initial C.1.2 detection is associated with a high substitution rate, and includes changes within the spike protein that have been associated with increased transmissibility or reduced neutralization sensitivity in SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern or variants of interest. Like Beta and Delta, C.1.2 shows significantly reduced neutralization sensitivity to plasma from vaccinees and individuals infected with the ancestral D614G virus. In contrast, convalescent donors infected with either Beta or Delta show high plasma neutralization against C.1.2. These functional data suggest that vaccine efficacy against C.1.2 will be equivalent to Beta and Delta, and that prior infection with either Beta or Delta will likely offer protection against C.1.2.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Risk factors Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Commun Journal subject: Biology / Science Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41467-022-29579-9

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Risk factors Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Nat Commun Journal subject: Biology / Science Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S41467-022-29579-9