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Winners and Losers in Academic Productivity During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Is the Gender Gap Widening for Faculty?
Ellinas, Elizabeth H; Ark, Tavinder K; Kaljo, Kristina; Quinn, Katherine G; Krier, Cassandre R; Farkas, Amy H.
  • Ellinas EH; Department of Anesthesiology, MCW Center for the Advancement of Women in Science and Medicine (AWSM), Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Ark TK; Kern Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Kaljo K; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Quinn KG; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Krier CR; Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • Farkas AH; Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin and Milwaukee VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(4): 487-494, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806232
ABSTRACT

Background:

The coronavirus pandemic accelerated academic medicine into the frontline of research and clinical work, leaving some faculty exhausted, and others with unanticipated time off. Women were particularly vulnerable, having increased responsibilities in both academic work and caregiving.

Methods:

The authors sought to determine faculty's responses to the pandemic, seeking predictors of accelerated versus decelerated academic productivity and work-life balance. In this survey of 424 faculty from a private Midwest academic medical center completed in August-September 2020, faculty rated multiple factors both "pre-COVID" and "during the COVID-19 lockdown," and a change score was calculated.

Results:

In a binary logistic regression model comparing faculty whose self-rated academic productivity increased with those whose productivity decreased, the authors found that controlling for multiple factors, men were more than twice as likely to be in the accelerated productivity group as women. In a similar model comparing partnered faculty whose self-rated work-life balance increased with partnered faculty whose work-life balance decreased, being in the positive work-life balance group was predicted by increased academic productivity, increased job stress, and having higher job priority than your partner.

Conclusions:

While the COVID-19 pandemic placed huge stressors on academic medical faculty, pandemic placed huge stressors on academic medical faculty, some experienced gains in productivity and work-life balance, with potential to widen the gender gap. As academic medicine evolves post-COVID, leaders should be aware that productivity and work-life balance predict each other, and that these factors have connections to work location, stress, and relationship dynamics, emphasizing the inseparable connections between work and life success.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study Topics: Long Covid Limits: Female / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Womens Health (Larchmt) Journal subject: Gynecology / Women's Health Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jwh.2021.0321

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study Topics: Long Covid Limits: Female / Humans / Male Language: English Journal: J Womens Health (Larchmt) Journal subject: Gynecology / Women's Health Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Jwh.2021.0321