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Does being a coach benefit clinician-educators? A mixed methods study of faculty self-efficacy, job satisfaction and burnout.
Elster, Martha J; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Muller-Juge, Virginie; Sheu, Leslie; Kaiser, Sunitha V; Hauer, Karen E.
  • Elster MJ; Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. martha.elster@ucsf.edu.
  • O'Sullivan PS; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Muller-Juge V; Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Sheu L; Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Kaiser SV; Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • Hauer KE; Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Perspect Med Educ ; 11(1): 45-52, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872787
ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:

Coaching is a growing clinician-educator role. Self-efficacy is a powerful faculty motivator that is associated positively with job satisfaction and negatively with burnout. This study examines self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and burnout in coaches and other clinician-educators.

METHODS:

We conducted a mixed methods study using a quantitative survey followed by qualitative interviews of faculty at the University of California, San Francisco. Coaches (funded 20% full-time equivalents), faculty with other funded education positions ("funded"), and faculty without funded education positions ("unfunded") completed a 48-item survey addressing self-efficacy (teaching, professional development, and scholarship), job satisfaction, and burnout. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by post-hoc tests and chi-square tests. To elaborate quantitative results, we conducted qualitative interviews of 15 faculty and analyzed data using framework analysis.

RESULTS:

202 of 384 faculty (52.6%) responded to the survey; 187 complete surveys were analyzed. Teaching self-efficacy was similar across groups. Coaches and funded educators had significantly higher professional development self-efficacy and job satisfaction than unfunded educators. Burnout was more prevalent in coaches and unfunded educators. Qualitative analysis yielded three themes sources of reward, academic identity, and strategies to mitigate burnout. Educator roles provide reward that enhances self-efficacy and job satisfaction but also generate competing demands. Coaches cited challenges in forming professional identities and working with struggling learners.

DISCUSSION:

The coaching role provides faculty with benefits similar to other funded educator roles, but the particular demands of the coach role may contribute to burnout.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Burnout, Professional / Job Satisfaction Type of study: Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Perspect Med Educ Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S40037-021-00676-7

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Burnout, Professional / Job Satisfaction Type of study: Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Perspect Med Educ Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S40037-021-00676-7