Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Effectiveness of the Ad26.COV2.S (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 Vaccine for Preventing COVID-19 Hospitalizations and Progression to High Disease Severity in the United States.
Lewis, Nathaniel M; Self, Wesley H; Gaglani, Manjusha; Ginde, Adit A; Douin, David J; Keipp Talbot, H; Casey, Jonathan D; Mohr, Nicholas M; Zepeski, Anne; Ghamande, Shekhar A; McNeal, Tresa A; Shapiro, Nathan I; Gibbs, Kevin W; Files, D Clark; Hager, David N; Shehu, Arber; Prekker, Matthew E; Erickson, Heidi L; Gong, Michelle N; Mohamed, Amira; Johnson, Nicholas J; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Steingrub, Jay S; Peltan, Ithan D; Brown, Amuel M; Martin, Emily T; Monto, Arnold S; Khan, Akram; Busse, Laurence W; Ten Lohuis, Caitlin C; Duggal, Bhijit; Wilson, Jennifer G; Gordon, Alexandra June; Qadir, Nida; Chang, Steven Y; Mallow, Christopher; Rivas, Carolina; Babcock, Hilary M; Kwon, Jennie H; Exline, Matthew C; Lauring, Adam S; Halasa, Natasha; Chappell, James D; Grijalva, Carlos G; Rice, Todd W; Rhoads, Jillian P; Jones, Ian D; Stubblefield, William B; Baughman, Adrienne; Womack, Kelsey N.
  • Lewis NM; CDC COVID-19 Response Team, Atlanta, GA, USA.
  • Self WH; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Gaglani M; Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas, USA.
  • Ginde AA; Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, Texas, USA.
  • Douin DJ; University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
  • Keipp Talbot H; University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
  • Casey JD; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Mohr NM; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Zepeski A; University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
  • Ghamande SA; University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
  • McNeal TA; Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas, USA.
  • Shapiro NI; Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas, USA.
  • Gibbs KW; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Files DC; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
  • Hager DN; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
  • Shehu A; Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • Prekker ME; Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • Erickson HL; Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Gong MN; Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Mohamed A; Montefiore Healthcare Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • Johnson NJ; Montefiore Healthcare Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • Srinivasan V; University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Steingrub JS; University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Peltan ID; Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Brown AM; Intermountain Medical Center and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
  • Martin ET; Intermountain Medical Center and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
  • Monto AS; University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
  • Khan A; University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
  • Busse LW; University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
  • Ten Lohuis CC; Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Duggal B; Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
  • Wilson JG; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
  • Gordon AJ; Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.
  • Qadir N; Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.
  • Chang SY; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Ronald Reagan-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.
  • Mallow C; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Ronald Reagan-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.
  • Rivas C; University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.
  • Babcock HM; University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.
  • Kwon JH; Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • Exline MC; Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • Lauring AS; Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
  • Halasa N; University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
  • Chappell JD; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Grijalva CG; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Rice TW; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Rhoads JP; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Jones ID; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Stubblefield WB; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Baughman A; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Womack KN; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890901
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Adults in the United States (US) began receiving the viral vector COVID-19 vaccine, Ad26.COV2.S (Johnson & Johnson [Janssen]), in February 2021. We evaluated Ad26.COV2.S vaccine effectiveness (VE) against COVID-19 hospitalization and high disease severity during the first 10 months of its use.

METHODS:

In a multicenter case-control analysis of US adults (≥18 years) hospitalized March 11-December 15, 2021, we estimated VE against susceptibility to COVID-19 hospitalization (VEs), comparing odds of prior vaccination with a single dose Ad26.COV2.S vaccine between hospitalized cases with COVID-19 and controls without COVID-19. Among hospitalized patients with COVID-19, we estimated VE against disease progression (VEp) to death or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), comparing odds of prior vaccination between patients with and without progression.

RESULTS:

After excluding patients receiving mRNA vaccines, among 3,979 COVID-19 case-patients (5% vaccinated with Ad26.COV2.S) and 2.229 controls (13% vaccinated with Ad26.COV2.S), VEs of Ad26.COV2.S against COVID-19 hospitalization was 70% (95% CI 63%-75%) overall, including 55% (29%-72%) among immunocompromised patients, and 72% (64%-77%) among immunocompetent patients, for whom VEs was similar at 14-90 days (73% [59%-82%]), 91-180 days (71% [60%-80%]), and 181-274 days (70% [54%-81%]) post-vaccination. Among hospitalized COVID-19 case-patients, VEp was 46% (18%-65%) among immunocompetent patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Ad26.COV2.S COVID-19 vaccine reduced the risk of COVID-19 hospitalization by 72% among immunocompetent adults without waning through 6 months post-vaccination. After hospitalization for COVID-19, vaccinated immunocompetent patients were less likely to require IMV or die compared to unvaccinated immunocompetent patients.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Cid

Similar

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS


Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Observational study Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal subject: Communicable Diseases Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Cid