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RELATIONSHIP OF EMOTIONS, SOCIAL ISOLATION, AND COVID-RELATED MEDIA TO SUBJECTIVE SLEEP QUALITY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC
Sleep ; 45(SUPPL 1):A21-A22, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1927380
ABSTRACT

Introduction:

The COVID-19 pandemic safety restrictions led to changes in social interactions and information seeking about the virus. For some, these led to increased negative emotions, feelings of social isolation, and increased COVID-related media consumption. We examined the relationship of these variables to subjective sleep quality from participant daily diaries kept early in the pandemic.

Methods:

From April 20th-May 12th, 2020, college (students, faculty/ staff, alumni, parents) and local (churches, community centers, libraries) community members (N=94, 72 women, ages 18-77) completed a 30-minute survey for before and during social distancing (measuring mental health, personality, social distancing, and demographics) for possible prizes. Participants then completed daily evening and morning diaries for 5-14 days describing daily affect, social isolation, emotion regulation, COVID media consumption, and subjective sleep quality.

Results:

Emotions During the pandemic, poor sleep quality was predicted by less positive mood (r(91)=.486, p<.001) and more negative mood (r(91)=-.433, p<.001). Participants with poorer sleep quality reported less success regulating their emotions that day (r(90)=.292, p=.005) and greater suppression of emotions (rather than cognitive reappraisals to regulate them) (r(91)=-.260, p=.012). Social Isolation Subjective sleep quality was not predicted by social distancing behaviors (r(88)=.069, p>.05);however, poorer sleep quality was significantly predicted by greater daily feelings of social isolation (r(91)=-.264, p=.005) and lower feelings of social life satisfaction (r(91)=.338, p<.001). COVID-related media Sleep quality was not significantly related to COVID-media consumption for all participants;however, moderation analyses showed that participants with low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, and high emotional well-being did experience poorer sleep quality associated with greater COVID media consumption (all p's<.05).

Conclusion:

That mood and social isolation are associated with sleep quality replicates previous findings. The pandemic, however, provided a unique opportunity to observe these relationships in individuals not normally socially isolated because of confounding variables (e.g., health issues, depression, anxiety) with known relationships to sleep quality. That COVID-related media was only related to sleep quality for more well-adjusted participants (low avoidance coping, low neuroticism, high emotional well-being) was surprising, suggesting some may find COVID-19 information anxiety-relieving rather than anxiety-provoking.
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Full text: Available Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: EMBASE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: Sleep Year: 2022 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: Databases of international organizations Database: EMBASE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: Sleep Year: 2022 Document Type: Article