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Reactogenicity of mRNA- and Non-mRNA-Based COVID-19 Vaccines among Lactating Mother and Child Dyads.
Jacob-Chow, Beth; Vasundhara, Kandarpa Lakshmi; Cheang, Hon Kit; Lee, Le Ye; Low, Jia Ming; Amin, Zubair.
  • Jacob-Chow B; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore.
  • Vasundhara KL; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore.
  • Cheang HK; Department of Paediatrics and Neonatology, Hospital Lam Wah Ee, George Town 11600, Malaysia.
  • Lee LY; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore.
  • Low JM; Department of Neonatology, Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block, Level 12, Singapore 119228, Singapore.
  • Amin Z; Department of Neonatology, Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block, Level 12, Singapore 119228, Singapore.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928696
ABSTRACT
The aims of the study are to (a) Describe the reactogenicity of WHO-approved two mRNA (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna) and two non-RNA (Oxford-AstraZeneca, Sinovac) vaccines among lactating mother and child pairs, and (b) Compare and contrast the reactogenicity between mRNA and non-mRNA vaccines. A cross-sectional, self-reported survey was conducted amongst 1784 lactating women who received COVID-19 vaccinations. The most common maternal adverse reaction was a local reaction at the injection site, and the largest minority of respondents, 49.6% (780/1571), reported experiencing worse symptoms when receiving the second dose compared to the first dose. Respondents reported no major adverse effects or behavioural changes in the breastfed children for the duration of the study period. Among respondents who received non-mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, a majority reported no change in lactation, but those who did more commonly reported changes in the quantity of milk supply and pain in the breast. The more commonly reported lactation changes (fluctuations in breast milk supply quantity and pain in the breast) for the non-mRNA vaccines were similar to those of respondents who received mRNA vaccines. Our study, with a large, racially diverse cohort, further augments earlier reported findings in that the COVID-19 vaccines tested in this study did not cause any serious adverse events in our population for the duration of our survey period, although long-term effects are yet to be studied.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Vaccines10071094

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Vaccines10071094