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From Warkworth House to the 21st century care homes: progress marked by persistent challenges.
Gordon, Adam L; Spilsbury, Karen; Achterberg, Wilco P; Adams, Rich; Jones, Liz; Goodman, Claire.
  • Gordon AL; Academic Unit of Injury, Recovery and Inflammation Sciences (IRIS), School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham DE22 3NE, UK.
  • Spilsbury K; NIHR Applied Research Collaboration-East Midlands (ARC-EM), Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK.
  • Achterberg WP; School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9DA, UK.
  • Adams R; NIHR Yorkshire and Humber Applied Research Collaboration, Leeds LS2 9DA, UK.
  • Jones L; Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden 2333, The Netherlands.
  • Goodman C; Sears Healthcare Ltd, Newbury RG14 1JN, UK.
Age Ageing ; 51(7)2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960975
ABSTRACT
Long-term care homes play an essential role within health and social care. Successful measures to support older people at home for longer have led to increased prevalence of disability, frailty and cognitive impairment in those who live in care homes over the last two decades. The need for care home places is projected to increase for the next two decades. Modern care homes provide care for people who are predominantly over 80, have multiple long-term conditions, take multiple medicines, are physically dependent and live with cognitive impairment. Residents do better when services recognise the contributions of staff and care home providers rather than treating residents as individual patients living in a communal setting. There is a strong case given residents' frailty, multimorbidity and disability, that care should be structured around Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). Care should be designed to allow opportunities for multiprofessional teams to come together for CGA, particularly if healthcare professionals are based outside care homes. Good data about care homes and residents are central to efforts to deliver high quality care-in some countries, these data are collected but not collated. Collating such data is a priority. Care home staff are under-recognised and underpaid-parity of pay and opportunity with NHS staff is the bare minimum to ensure that the best are recruited and retained in the sector. During the COVID-19 pandemic, residents and relatives have frequently been left out of decisions about policies that affect them, and better consultation is needed to deliver high quality care.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Frailty / COVID-19 Type of study: Risk factors Limits: Aged / Humans Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ageing

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Frailty / COVID-19 Type of study: Risk factors Limits: Aged / Humans Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ageing