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Prosocial modelling matters: the association between parent and faculty involvement in fighting COVID-19 with medical students' career commitment.
Wang, Dan; Ye, Xiaoyang; Wu, Hongbin.
  • Wang D; National Center for Health Professions Education Development, Peking University, Beijing, China.
  • Ye X; Annenberg Institute for School Reform, Brown University, Providence, USA.
  • Wu H; Institute of Medical Education/National Center for Health Professions Education Development, Peking University, Beijing, China.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 3146-3156, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097042
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Role models are essential in medical education, yet empirical research is relatively insufficient on the influence of prosocial modelling on medical students' career commitment. The prosocial behaviour of medical staff involved in the fight against the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at the beginning of 2020 presents an opportunity to fill the research gap. We explored and compared the different associations of the two most important role models for medical students - parents and faculty- with medical students' career commitment.

METHODS:

The cross-sectional study was conducted with 99,559 undergraduate students majoring in clinical medicine in mainland China. Questions were asked to collect information about participants in the battle against COVID-19, medical students' determination to practice medicine after graduation, as well as students' socio-demographic characteristics. Chi-square tests and hierarchical regressions were performed to examine the associations between parent and faculty involvement and students' career commitment.

RESULTS:

The results showed statistically significant associations between prosocial modelling during the COVID-19 pandemic in China and students' intention to pursue medical careers. The association of faculty involvement (OR = 1.165, p < .001) with students' career commitment was greater than that of parents (OR = 0.970, p > .05). For faculty involvement, the association was stronger among male students (OR = 1.323, p < .001) and students who were already determined to be doctors (OR = 1.219, p < .001) before the pandemic.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study provides new evidence on the potential roles of parents and faculty in shaping medical students' career commitment. Encouraging faculty to act as positive role models could help medical students increase their intention to become doctors.KEY MESSAGESProsocial modelling could enhance students' intention to pursue medical careers.The association of prosocial behaviour of faculty is larger than that of parents on medical students.Those who have prior medical career commitment are much more likely to persist in the medical profession, and prosocial modelling of faculty is positively associated with their medical career commitment.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Students, Medical / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Humans / Male Language: English Journal: Ann Med Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 07853890.2022.2139410

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Students, Medical / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Humans / Male Language: English Journal: Ann Med Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 07853890.2022.2139410