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TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 promote SARS-CoV-2 infection of human small intestinal enterocytes.
Zang, Ruochen; Gomez Castro, Maria Florencia; McCune, Broc T; Zeng, Qiru; Rothlauf, Paul W; Sonnek, Naomi M; Liu, Zhuoming; Brulois, Kevin F; Wang, Xin; Greenberg, Harry B; Diamond, Michael S; Ciorba, Matthew A; Whelan, Sean P J; Ding, Siyuan.
  • Zang R; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Gomez Castro MF; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • McCune BT; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Zeng Q; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Rothlauf PW; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Sonnek NM; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Liu Z; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Brulois KF; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Wang X; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Greenberg HB; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Diamond MS; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Ciorba MA; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Whelan SPJ; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
  • Ding S; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Key Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, St.
Sci Immunol ; 5(47)2020 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260039
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ABSTRACT
Gastrointestinal symptoms and fecal shedding of SARS-CoV-2 RNA are frequently observed in COVID-19 patients. However, it is unclear whether SARS-CoV-2 replicates in the human intestine and contributes to possible fecal-oral transmission. Here, we report productive infection of SARS-CoV-2 in ACE2+ mature enterocytes in human small intestinal enteroids. Expression of two mucosa-specific serine proteases, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4, facilitated SARS-CoV-2 spike fusogenic activity and promoted virus entry into host cells. We also demonstrate that viruses released into the intestinal lumen were inactivated by simulated human colonic fluid, and infectious virus was not recovered from the stool specimens of COVID-19 patients. Our results highlight the intestine as a potential site of SARS-CoV-2 replication, which may contribute to local and systemic illness and overall disease progression.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type: Article Main subject: Serine Endopeptidases / Enterocytes / Virus Internalization / Betacoronavirus / Membrane Proteins Subject: Serine Endopeptidases / Enterocytes / Virus Internalization / Betacoronavirus / Membrane Proteins Language: English Year: 2020

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type: Article Main subject: Serine Endopeptidases / Enterocytes / Virus Internalization / Betacoronavirus / Membrane Proteins Subject: Serine Endopeptidases / Enterocytes / Virus Internalization / Betacoronavirus / Membrane Proteins Language: English Year: 2020