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Improving Stroke Care in Times of the COVID-19 Pandemic Through Simulation: Practice Your Protocols!
Kurz, Martin W; Ospel, Johanna Maria; Daehli Kurz, Kathinka; Goyal, Mayank.
  • Kurz MW; Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Research Group (M.W.K.), Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
  • Ospel JM; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway (M.W.K.).
  • Daehli Kurz K; Department of Clinical Neurosciences (J.M.O., M.G.), University of Calgary, AB, Canada.
  • Goyal M; Department of Radiology (K.D.K.), Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Stroke ; 51(7): 2273-2275, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-327109
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Communicable Disease Control TREATS Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents
Subject
Communicable Disease Control
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents
2. Cerebrovascular accident AFFECTS Uncertainty
Subject
Cerebrovascular accident
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Uncertainty
3. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Nurses
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Nurses
4. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Physicians
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Physicians
5. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Technician
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Technician
6. Communicable Disease Control TREATS Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents
Subject
Communicable Disease Control
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents
7. Cerebrovascular accident AFFECTS Uncertainty
Subject
Cerebrovascular accident
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Uncertainty
8. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Nurses
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Nurses
9. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Physicians
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Physicians
10. Uncertainty PROCESS_OF Technician
Subject
Uncertainty
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Technician
ABSTRACT
During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, infectious disease control is of utmost importance in acute stroke treatment. This is a new situation for most stroke teams that often leads to uncertainty among physicians, nurses, and technicians who are in immediate contact with patients. The situation is made even more complicated by numerous new regulations and protocols that are released in rapid succession. Herein, we are describing our experience with simulation training for COVID-19 stroke treatment protocols. One week of simulation training allowed us to identify numerous latent safety threats and to adjust our institution-specific protocols to mitigate them. It also helped our physicians and nurses to practice relevant tasks and behavioral patterns (eg, proper donning and doffing PPE, where to dispose potentially contaminated equipment) to minimize their infectious exposure and to adapt to the new situation. We therefore strongly encourage other hospitals to adopt simulation training to prepare their medical teams for code strokes during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Personnel, Hospital / Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Stroke / Pandemics / Simulation Training / Betacoronavirus / Neurology Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Stroke Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: STROKEAHA.120.030091

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Personnel, Hospital / Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Stroke / Pandemics / Simulation Training / Betacoronavirus / Neurology Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Stroke Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: STROKEAHA.120.030091