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Syrian hamsters as a small animal model for SARS-CoV-2 infection and countermeasure development.
Imai, Masaki; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Hatta, Masato; Loeber, Samantha; Halfmann, Peter J; Nakajima, Noriko; Watanabe, Tokiko; Ujie, Michiko; Takahashi, Kenta; Ito, Mutsumi; Yamada, Shinya; Fan, Shufang; Chiba, Shiho; Kuroda, Makoto; Guan, Lizheng; Takada, Kosuke; Armbrust, Tammy; Balogh, Aaron; Furusawa, Yuri; Okuda, Moe; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yasuhara, Atsuhiro; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Lopes, Tiago J S; Kiso, Maki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Kinoshita, Noriko; Ohmagari, Norio; Hattori, Shin-Ichiro; Takeda, Makoto; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Krammer, Florian; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro.
  • Imai M; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Iwatsuki-Horimoto K; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Hatta M; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Loeber S; Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.
  • Halfmann PJ; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Nakajima N; Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 162-8640 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Watanabe T; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ujie M; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Takahashi K; Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 162-8640 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ito M; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Yamada S; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Fan S; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Chiba S; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Kuroda M; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Guan L; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Takada K; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Armbrust T; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Balogh A; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Furusawa Y; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Okuda M; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ueki H; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Yasuhara A; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Sakai-Tagawa Y; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Lopes TJS; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Kiso M; Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711.
  • Yamayoshi S; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Kinoshita N; Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 108-8639 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ohmagari N; Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 162-8655 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Hattori SI; Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 162-8655 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Takeda M; Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 162-8655 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Mitsuya H; Department of Virology 3, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 208-0011 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Krammer F; Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 162-8655 Tokyo, Japan.
  • Suzuki T; Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029.
  • Kawaoka Y; Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 162-8640 Tokyo, Japan.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(28): 16587-16595, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611003
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Coronavirus Infections AFFECTS Borg Category-Ratio 10 Perceived Exertion Score 5
Subject
Coronavirus Infections
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Borg Category-Ratio 10 Perceived Exertion Score 5
2. Isolate - microorganism PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Isolate - microorganism
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
3. Lung LOCATION_OF High Grade Lesion
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
High Grade Lesion
4. Lung PART_OF Hamsters
Subject
Lung
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Hamsters
5. Lung LOCATION_OF Isolate - microorganism
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Isolate - microorganism
6. Lung LOCATION_OF Virus
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Virus
7. Coronavirus Infections AFFECTS Borg Category-Ratio 10 Perceived Exertion Score 5
Subject
Coronavirus Infections
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Borg Category-Ratio 10 Perceived Exertion Score 5
8. Isolate - microorganism PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Isolate - microorganism
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
9. Lung LOCATION_OF High Grade Lesion
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
High Grade Lesion
10. Lung PART_OF Hamsters
Subject
Lung
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Hamsters
11. Lung LOCATION_OF Isolate - microorganism
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Isolate - microorganism
12. Lung LOCATION_OF Virus
Subject
Lung
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Virus
ABSTRACT
At the end of 2019, a novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; SARS-CoV-2) was detected in Wuhan, China, that spread rapidly around the world, with severe consequences for human health and the global economy. Here, we assessed the replicative ability and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 isolates in Syrian hamsters. SARS-CoV-2 isolates replicated efficiently in the lungs of hamsters, causing severe pathological lung lesions following intranasal infection. In addition, microcomputed tomographic imaging revealed severe lung injury that shared characteristics with SARS-CoV-2-infected human lung, including severe, bilateral, peripherally distributed, multilobular ground glass opacity, and regions of lung consolidation. SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters mounted neutralizing antibody responses and were protected against subsequent rechallenge with SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, passive transfer of convalescent serum to naïve hamsters efficiently suppressed the replication of the virus in the lungs even when the serum was administrated 2 d postinfection of the serum-treated hamsters. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that this Syrian hamster model will be useful for understanding SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and testing vaccines and antiviral drugs.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Disease Models, Animal / Lung Type of study: Diagnostic study Topics: Vaccines Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Journal: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Pnas.2009799117

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Disease Models, Animal / Lung Type of study: Diagnostic study Topics: Vaccines Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Journal: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Pnas.2009799117