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The European response to the WHO call to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health problem.
Arbyn, Marc; Gultekin, Murat; Morice, Philippe; Nieminen, Pekka; Cruickshank, Maggie; Poortmans, Philip; Kelly, Daniel; Poljak, Mario; Bergeron, Christine; Ritchie, David; Schmidt, Dietmar; Kyrgiou, Maria; Van den Bruel, Ann; Bruni, Laia; Basu, Partha; Bray, Freddie; Weiderpass, Elisabete.
  • Arbyn M; Coordinator Unit Cancer Epidemiology, Belgian Cancer Centre, Sciensano, Brussels, Belgium.
  • Gultekin M; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynaecological Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Morice P; Department of Gynecologic Surgery, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France.
  • Nieminen P; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki and University Hospital of Helsinki, Finland.
  • Cruickshank M; Aberdeen Centre for Women's Health Research, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
  • Poortmans P; European Cancer Organisation, Brussels, Belgium.
  • Kelly D; School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University, UK.
  • Poljak M; Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
  • Bergeron C; Laboratoire Cerba, Cergy Pontoise, France.
  • Ritchie D; Association of European Cancer Leagues, Brussels, Belgium.
  • Schmidt D; MVZ of Pathology, Cytology and Molecular Diagnostics, Trier, University of Kiel, Germany.
  • Kyrgiou M; Department of Gut, Metabolism and Reproduction & Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK.
  • Van den Bruel A; West London Gynaecological Cancer Centre, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
  • Bruni L; Academic Centre for General Practice, University of Leuven, Belgium.
  • Basu P; Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology - IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Bray F; International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
  • Weiderpass E; International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Int J Cancer ; 148(2): 277-284, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635339
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
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ABSTRACT
The age-standardised incidence of cervical cancer in Europe varies widely by country (between 3 and 25/100000 women-years) in 2018. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage is low in countries with the highest incidence and screening performance is heterogeneous among European countries. A broad group of delegates of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations endorse the principles of the WHO call to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health problem, also in Europe. All European nations should, by 2030, reach at least 90% HPV vaccine coverage among girls by the age of 15 years and also boys, if cost-effective; they should introduce organised population-based HPV-based screening and achieve 70% of screening coverage in the target age group, providing also HPV testing on self-samples for nonscreened or underscreened women; and to manage 90% of screen-positive women. To guide member states, a group of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations engage to assist in the rollout of a series of concerted evidence-based actions. European health authorities are requested to mandate a group of experts to develop the third edition of European Guidelines for Quality Assurance of Cervical Cancer prevention based on integrated HPV vaccination and screening and to monitor the progress towards the elimination goal. The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, having interrupted prevention activities temporarily, should not deviate stakeholders from this ambition. In the immediate postepidemic phase, health professionals should focus on high-risk women and adhere to cost-effective policies including self-sampling.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / Public Health / Papillomavirus Infections / Alphapapillomavirus / Papillomavirus Vaccines Type of study: Diagnostic study / Screening study Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Int J Cancer Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijc.33189

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / Public Health / Papillomavirus Infections / Alphapapillomavirus / Papillomavirus Vaccines Type of study: Diagnostic study / Screening study Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Int J Cancer Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijc.33189