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Mental health before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a longitudinal probability sample survey of the UK population.
Pierce, Matthias; Hope, Holly; Ford, Tamsin; Hatch, Stephani; Hotopf, Matthew; John, Ann; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Webb, Roger; Wessely, Simon; McManus, Sally; Abel, Kathryn M.
  • Pierce M; Centre for Women's Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: matthias.pierce@manchester.ac.uk.
  • Hope H; Centre for Women's Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
  • Ford T; Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
  • Hatch S; Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; ESRC Centre for Society and Mental Health, King's College London, London, UK.
  • Hotopf M; Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Biomedical Research Centre, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London.
  • John A; Population Data Science, Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
  • Kontopantelis E; Division of Informatics, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
  • Webb R; Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health Sciences, and National Institute for Health Research Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
  • Wessely S; Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
  • McManus S; National Centre for Social Research, London, UK; School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, UK.
  • Abel KM; Centre for Women's Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust, Manchester, UK.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 7(10): 883-892, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665107
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. mental health PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
mental health
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
2. mental health PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
mental health
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

The potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on population mental health is of increasing global concern. We examine changes in adult mental health in the UK population before and during the lockdown.

METHODS:

In this secondary analysis of a national, longitudinal cohort study, households that took part in Waves 8 or 9 of the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) panel, including all members aged 16 or older in April, 2020, were invited to complete the COVID-19 web survey on April 23-30, 2020. Participants who were unable to make an informed decision as a result of incapacity, or who had unknown postal addresses or addresses abroad were excluded. Mental health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Repeated cross-sectional analyses were done to examine temporal trends. Fixed-effects regression models were fitted to identify within-person change compared with preceding trends.

FINDINGS:

Waves 6-9 of the UKHLS had 53 351 participants. Eligible participants for the COVID-19 web survey were from households that took part in Waves 8 or 9, and 17 452 (41·2%) of 42 330 eligible people participated in the web survey. Population prevalence of clinically significant levels of mental distress rose from 18·9% (95% CI 17·8-20·0) in 2018-19 to 27·3% (26·3-28·2) in April, 2020, one month into UK lockdown. Mean GHQ-12 score also increased over this time, from 11·5 (95% CI 11·3-11·6) in 2018-19, to 12·6 (12·5-12·8) in April, 2020. This was 0·48 (95% CI 0·07-0·90) points higher than expected when accounting for previous upward trends between 2014 and 2018. Comparing GHQ-12 scores within individuals, adjusting for time trends and significant predictors of change, increases were greatest in 18-24-year-olds (2·69 points, 95% CI 1·89-3·48), 25-34-year-olds (1·57, 0·96-2·18), women (0·92, 0·50-1·35), and people living with young children (1·45, 0·79-2·12). People employed before the pandemic also averaged a notable increase in GHQ-12 score (0·63, 95% CI 0·20-1·06).

INTERPRETATION:

By late April, 2020, mental health in the UK had deteriorated compared with pre-COVID-19 trends. Policies emphasising the needs of women, young people, and those with preschool aged children are likely to play an important part in preventing future mental illness.

FUNDING:

None.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Mental Disorders Type of study: Diagnostic study / Observational study / Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Lancet Psychiatry Year: 2020 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Coronavirus Infections / Mental Disorders Type of study: Diagnostic study / Observational study / Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Lancet Psychiatry Year: 2020 Document Type: Article