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Early-Stage Radiology Volume Effects and Considerations with the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic: Adaptations, Risks, and Lessons Learned.
Norbash, Alexander M; Moore, Arl Van; Recht, Michael P; Brink, James A; Hess, Christopher P; Won, Jay J; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Brown, Manuel; Enzmann, Dieter.
  • Norbash AM; Chair, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California. Electronic address: anorbash@ucsd.edu.
  • Moore AV; Chair, Chief Executive Officer, Strategic Radiology, LLC, Palmetto, Florida.
  • Recht MP; Chair, Department of Radiology, New York University, Grossman School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • Brink JA; Chair, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Hess CP; Chair, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, California.
  • Won JJ; University of California, Los Angeles, California.
  • Jain S; University of California, San Diego, California.
  • Sun X; University of California, San Diego, California.
  • Brown M; Chair, Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan.
  • Enzmann D; Chair, Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, California.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(9): 1086-1095, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680404
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in significant loss of radiologic volume as a result of shelter-at-home mandates and delay of non-time-sensitive imaging studies to preserve capacity for the pandemic. We analyze the volume-related impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on six academic medical systems (AMSs), three in high COVID-19 surge (high-surge) and three in low COVID-19 surge (low-surge) regions, and a large national private practice coalition. We sought to assess adaptations, risks of actions, and lessons learned.

METHODS:

Percent change of 2020 volume per week was compared with the corresponding 2019 volume calculated for each of the 14 imaging modalities and overall total, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient studies in high-surge AMSs and low-surge AMSs and the practice coalition.

RESULTS:

Steep examination volume drops occurred during week 11, with slow recovery starting week 17. The lowest total AMS volume drop was 40% compared with the same period the previous year, and the largest was 70%. The greatest decreases were seen with screening mammography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans, and the smallest decreases were seen with PET/CT, x-ray, and interventional radiology. Inpatient volume was least impacted compared with outpatient or emergency imaging.

CONCLUSION:

Large percentage drops in volume were seen from weeks 11 through 17, were seen with screening studies, and were larger for the high-surge AMSs than for the low-surge AMSs. The lowest drops in volume were seen with modalities in which delays in imaging had greater perceived adverse consequences.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Radiology / Diagnostic Imaging / Infection Control / Coronavirus Infections / Pandemics / Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography Type of study: Diagnostic study / Etiology study / Incidence study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Limits: Female / Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: J Am Coll Radiol Journal subject: Radiology Year: 2020 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Radiology / Diagnostic Imaging / Infection Control / Coronavirus Infections / Pandemics / Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography Type of study: Diagnostic study / Etiology study / Incidence study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Limits: Female / Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: J Am Coll Radiol Journal subject: Radiology Year: 2020 Document Type: Article