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Trend change of the transmission route of COVID-19-related symptoms in Japan.
Eguchi, A; Yoneoka, D; Shi, S; Tanoue, Y; Kawashima, T; Nomura, S; Matsuura, K; Makiyama, K; Ejima, K; Gilmour, S; Nishiura, H; Miyata, H.
  • Eguchi A; Department of Sustainable Health Science, Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.
  • Yoneoka D; Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; Graduate School of Public Health, St. Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Shi S; Department of Systems Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Laboratory for Synthetic Biology, RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research, Osaka, Japan.
  • Tanoue Y; Institute for Business and Finance, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Kawashima T; Department of Mathematical and Computing Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nomura S; Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Matsuura K; Department of Management Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan; HOXO-M Inc., Tokyo, Japan.
  • Makiyama K; HOXO-M Inc., Tokyo, Japan; Yahoo Japan Corporation, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ejima K; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington, Bloomington, USA.
  • Gilmour S; Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Nishiura H; Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan.
  • Miyata H; Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: hiroaki.miyata@gmail.com.
Public Health ; 187: 157-160, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733655
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Infection COEXISTS_WITH Community-Acquired Infections
Subject
Infection
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Community-Acquired Infections
2. Infection COEXISTS_WITH Community-Acquired Infections
Subject
Infection
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Community-Acquired Infections
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

The Japanese prime minister declared a state of emergency on April 7 2020 to combat the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This declaration was unique in the sense that it was essentially driven by the voluntary restraint of the residents. We examined the change of the infection route by investigating contact experiences with COVID-19-positive cases. STUDY

DESIGN:

This study is a population-level questionnaire-based study using a social networking service (SNS).

METHODS:

To assess the impact of the declaration, this study used population-level questionnaire data collected from an SNS with 121,375 respondents (between March 27 and May 5) to assess the change in transmission routes over the study period, which was measured by investigating the association between COVID-19-related symptoms and (self-reported) contact with COVID-19-infected individuals.

RESULTS:

The results of this study show that the declaration prevented infections in the workplace, but increased domestic infections as people stayed at home. However, after April 24, workplace infections started to increase again, driven by the increase in community-acquired infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

While careful interpretation is necessary because our data are self-reported from voluntary SNS users, these findings indicate the impact of the declaration on the change in transmission routes of COVID-19 over time in Japan.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Disease Outbreaks / Coronavirus Infections / Pandemics Type of study: Observational study / Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Public Health Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.puhe.2020.08.020

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Disease Outbreaks / Coronavirus Infections / Pandemics Type of study: Observational study / Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Journal: Public Health Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.puhe.2020.08.020