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A Review of Viral Shedding in Resolved and Convalescent COVID-19 Patients.
Karia, Rutu; Nagraj, Sanjana.
  • Karia R; Anna Medical College and Research Center, Montagne Blanche, Mauritius.
  • Nagraj S; Internal Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY USA.
SN Compr Clin Med ; 2(11): 2086-2095, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-747101
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
2. Viral Shedding COEXISTS_WITH physiologic resolution
Subject
Viral Shedding
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
physiologic resolution
3. Mild disorder PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Mild disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
4. Viral Shedding PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Viral Shedding
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
5. Nasopharynx LOCATION_OF Virus
Subject
Nasopharynx
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Virus
6. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
7. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
8. Viral Shedding COEXISTS_WITH physiologic resolution
Subject
Viral Shedding
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
physiologic resolution
9. Mild disorder PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Mild disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
10. Viral Shedding PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Viral Shedding
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
11. Nasopharynx LOCATION_OF Virus
Subject
Nasopharynx
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Virus
12. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
ABSTRACT
As of August 06, 2020, 18.9 million cases of SARS-CoV-2 and more than 711,000 deaths have been reported. As per available data, 80% of the patients experience mild disease, 20% need hospital admission, and about 5% require intensive care. To date, several modes of transmission such as droplet, contact, airborne, blood borne, and fomite have been described as plausible. Several studies have demonstrated shedding of the virus from patients after being free from symptoms, i.e. prolonged virus shedding. While few studies demonstrated virus shedding in convalescent patients, i.e. those testing negative for presence of virus on nasopharyngeal and/or oropharyngeal swabs, yet virus shedding was reported from other sources. Maximum duration of conversion time reported among the included studies was 60 days, while the least duration was 3 days. Viral shedding from sources other than nasopharynx and oropharynx, like stools, urine, saliva, semen, and tears, was reported. More number of studies described virus shedding from gastrointestinal tract (mainly in stools), while least a number of cases tested positive for the virus in tears. Prolonged viral shedding is important to consider while discontinuing isolation procedures and/or discharging SARS-CoV-2 patients. The risk of transmission varies in magnitude and depends on the infectivity of the shed virus in biological samples and the patient population involved. Clinical decision-making should be governed by clinical scenario, guidelines, detectable viral load, source of detectable virus, infectivity, and patient-related factors.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: SN Compr Clin Med Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S42399-020-00499-3

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: SN Compr Clin Med Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S42399-020-00499-3