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Adapting re-usable elastomeric respirators to utilise anaesthesia circuit filters using a 3D-printed adaptor - a potential alternative to address N95 shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Liu, D C Y; Koo, T H; Wong, J K K; Wong, Y H; Fung, K S C; Chan, Y; Lim, H S.
  • Liu DCY; Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
  • Koo TH; Department of Occupational Therapy, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
  • Wong JKK; Department of Occupational Therapy, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
  • Wong YH; Operating Room, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
  • Fung KSC; Department of Pathology, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
  • Chan Y; Occupational Safety and Health Team, Hospital Authority Kowloon East Cluster, Hong Kong.
  • Lim HS; Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong.
Anaesthesia ; 75(8): 1022-1027, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751832
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Mechanical Ventilator USES ADAPTER
Subject
Mechanical Ventilator
Predicate
USES
Object
ADAPTER
2. Mechanical Ventilator USES ADAPTER
Subject
Mechanical Ventilator
Predicate
USES
Object
ADAPTER
ABSTRACT
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the demand for disposable N95 respirators. Re-usable elastomeric respirators may provide a suitable alternative. Proprietary elastomeric respirator filters may become depleted as demand increases. An alternative may be the virus/bacterial filters used in anaesthesia circuits, if they can be adequately fitted onto the elastomeric respirators. In addition, many re-usable elastomeric respirators do not filter exhaled breaths. If used for sterile procedures, this would also require modification. We designed a 3D-printed adaptor that permits elastomeric respirators to interface with anaesthesia circuit filters and created a simple modification to divert exhaled breaths through the filter. We conducted a feasibility study evaluating the performance of our modified elastomeric respirators. A convenience sample of eight volunteers was recruited. Quantitative fit testing, respiratory rate and end-tidal carbon dioxide were recorded during fit testing exercises and after 1 h of wear. All eight volunteers obtained excellent quantitative fit testing throughout the trial. The mean (SD) end-tidal carbon dioxide was 4.5 (0.5) kPa and 4.6 (0.4) kPa at baseline and after 1 h of wear (p = 0.148). The mean (SD) respiratory rate was 17 (4) breaths.min-1 and 17 (3) breaths.min-1 at baseline and after 1 h of wear (p = 0.435). Four out of eight subjects self-reported discomfort; two reported facial pressure, one reported exhalation resistance and one reported transient dizziness on exertion. Re-usable elastomeric respirators to utilise anaesthesia circuit filters through a 3D-printed adaptor may be a potential alternative to disposable N95 respirators during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Ventilators, Mechanical / Coronavirus Infections / Filtration / Betacoronavirus Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Anaesthesia Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Anae.15108

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Pneumonia, Viral / Ventilators, Mechanical / Coronavirus Infections / Filtration / Betacoronavirus Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Anaesthesia Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Anae.15108