Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Is recurrence possible in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)? Case series and systematic review of literature.
Gidari, Anna; Nofri, Marco; Saccarelli, Luca; Bastianelli, Sabrina; Sabbatini, Samuele; Bozza, Silvia; Camilloni, Barbara; Fusco-Moffa, Igino; Monari, Claudia; De Robertis, Edoardo; Mencacci, Antonella; Francisci, Daniela.
  • Gidari A; Department of Medicine, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. anna.gidari@studenti.unipg.it.
  • Nofri M; Department of Medicine, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Saccarelli L; Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain therapy Center, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Bastianelli S; Department of Medicine, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Sabbatini S; Department of Medicine, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Bozza S; Department of Medicine, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Camilloni B; Department of Medicine, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Fusco-Moffa I; Department of Prevention, Local Health Unit Umbria 1, Travel Medicine Unit, Perugia, Italy.
  • Monari C; Department of Medicine, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • De Robertis E; Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain therapy Center, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Mencacci A; Department of Medicine, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
  • Francisci D; Department of Medicine, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(1): 1-12, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841058
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Possible COEXISTS_WITH COVID-19
Subject
Possible
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
COVID-19
2. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
3. Respiratory sample PART_OF Tract
Subject
Respiratory sample
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Tract
4. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
5. Nucleoproteins PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Nucleoproteins
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
6. Respiratory sample PART_OF Patients
Subject
Respiratory sample
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Patients
7. Possible COEXISTS_WITH COVID-19
Subject
Possible
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
COVID-19
8. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
9. Respiratory sample PART_OF Tract
Subject
Respiratory sample
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Tract
10. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
11. Nucleoproteins PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Nucleoproteins
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
12. Respiratory sample PART_OF Patients
Subject
Respiratory sample
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Patients
ABSTRACT
Can a patient diagnosed with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) be infected again? This question is still unsolved. We tried to analyze local and literature cases with a positive respiratory swab after recovery. We collected data from symptomatic patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Italian Umbria Region that, after recovery, were again positive for SARS-CoV-2 in respiratory tract specimens. Samples were also assessed for infectivity in vitro. A systematic review of similar cases reported in the literature was performed. The study population was composed of 9 patients during a 4-month study period. Among the new positive samples, six were inoculated in Vero-E6 cells and showed no growth and negative molecular test in culture supernatants. All patients were positive for IgG against SARS-CoV-2 nucleoprotein and/or S protein. Conducting a review of the literature, 1350 similar cases have been found. The presumptive reactivation occurred in 34.5 days on average (standard deviation, SD, 18.7 days) after COVID-19 onset, when the 5.6% of patients presented fever and the 27.6% symptoms. The outcome was favorable in 96.7% of patients, while the 1.1% of them were still hospitalized at the time of data collection and the 2.1% died. Several hypotheses have been formulated to explain new positive respiratory samples after confirmed negativity. According to this study, the phenomenon seems to be due to the prolonged detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA traces in respiratory samples of recovered patients. The failure of the virus to replicate in vitro suggests its inability to replicate in vivo.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Testing / COVID-19 Type of study: Case report / Diagnostic study / Prognostic study / Reviews / Systematic review/Meta Analysis Limits: Adult / Aged / Animals / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis Journal subject: Communicable Diseases / Microbiology Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S10096-020-04057-6

Similar

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS


Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Testing / COVID-19 Type of study: Case report / Diagnostic study / Prognostic study / Reviews / Systematic review/Meta Analysis Limits: Adult / Aged / Animals / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis Journal subject: Communicable Diseases / Microbiology Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S10096-020-04057-6