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Changes in substance use among young adults during a respiratory disease pandemic.
Sharma, Pravesh; Ebbert, Jon O; Rosedahl, Jordan K; Philpot, Lindsey M.
  • Sharma P; Department of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, WI, USA.
  • Ebbert JO; Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
  • Rosedahl JK; Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
  • Philpot LM; Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
SAGE Open Med ; 8: 2050312120965321, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885960
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Alcohol or Other Drugs use PROCESS_OF Young Adult
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Young Adult
2. Alcohol or Other Drugs use COEXISTS_WITH Respiration Disorders
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Respiration Disorders
3. Eye LOCATION_OF Stress
Subject
Eye
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Stress
4. Tobacco ADMINISTERED_TO Young Adult
Subject
Tobacco
Predicate
ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Young Adult
5. Alcohol or Other Drugs use AFFECTS Respondents
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Respondents
6. Alcohol or Other Drugs use PROCESS_OF Young Adult
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Young Adult
7. Alcohol or Other Drugs use COEXISTS_WITH Respiration Disorders
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Respiration Disorders
8. Eye LOCATION_OF Stress
Subject
Eye
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Stress
9. Tobacco ADMINISTERED_TO Young Adult
Subject
Tobacco
Predicate
ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Young Adult
10. Alcohol or Other Drugs use AFFECTS Respondents
Subject
Alcohol or Other Drugs use
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Respondents
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

News articles, commentaries, and opinion articles have suggested that ongoing social distancing measures coupled with economic challenges during COVID-19 may worsen stress, affective state, and substance use across the globe. We sought to advance our understanding of the differences between individuals who change their substance use patterns during a public health crisis and those who do not.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional survey of young adults (18-25 years of age) assessing respondent characteristics and vaping, tobacco, alcohol, and/or marijuana use. We calculated prevalence estimates, prevalence changes, and prevalence ratios with associated 95% confidence intervals and looked for differences with the chi-square test.

RESULTS:

Of the total sample, 53.2% (n = 542/1018) young adults reported vaping or using tobacco, alcohol, and/or marijuana. Among the 542 respondents reporting use, 34.3% reported a change in their use patterns. Among respondents reporting changes in substance use patterns during the pandemic (n = 186), 68.8% reported an increase in alcohol use, 44.0% reported a decrease in vaping product use, and 47.3% reported a decrease in tobacco product use due to COVID-19. Substance use changed significantly for respondents with increasing degree of loneliness (continuous loneliness score prevalence ratio = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.25), anxiety (prevalence ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.85), and depression (prevalence ratio = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.13-1.82).

CONCLUSION:

Self-reported substance use among young adults was observed to change during a pandemic, and the degree of loneliness appears to impact these changes. Innovative strategies are needed to address loneliness, anxiety, depression, and substance use during global health crises that impact social contact.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Journal: SAGE Open Med Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 2050312120965321

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials / Risk factors Language: English Journal: SAGE Open Med Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 2050312120965321