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Impact of exposure to patients with COVID-19 on residents and fellows: an international survey of 1420 trainees.
Cravero, Anne L; Kim, Nicole J; Feld, Lauren D; Berry, Kristin; Rabiee, Atoosa; Bazarbashi, Najdat; Bassin, Sandhya; Lee, Tzu-Hao; Moon, Andrew M; Qi, Xiaolong; Liang, Peter S; Aby, Elizabeth S; Khan, Mohammad Qasim; Young, Kristen J; Patel, Arpan; Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Kobeissy, Abdallah; Hashim, Almoutaz; Houser, Allysia; Ioannou, George N.
  • Cravero AL; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Kim NJ; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Feld LD; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Berry K; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • Rabiee A; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Washington DC Veterans Affair Medical Center, Washington, District of Colombia, USA.
  • Bazarbashi N; Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • Bassin S; Department of Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, USA.
  • Lee TH; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
  • Moon AM; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
  • Qi X; CHESS Center, Institute of Portal Hypertension, the First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China.
  • Liang PS; VA New York Harbor Health Care System and NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, USA.
  • Aby ES; Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Khan MQ; Department of Gastroenterology, NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, Illinois, USA.
  • Young KJ; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.
  • Patel A; Division of Gastroenterology and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Digestive Diseases, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California, USA.
  • Wijarnpreecha K; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, USA.
  • Kobeissy A; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio, USA.
  • Hashim A; Division of Gastroenterology and Transplant Hepatology, University of Jeddah, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
  • Houser A; Department of Medicine, Phoenix Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
  • Ioannou GN; Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA georgei@medicine.washington.edu.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1153): 706-715, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889925
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

To determine how self-reported level of exposure to patients with novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) affected the perceived safety, training and well-being of residents and fellows.

METHODS:

We administered an anonymous, voluntary, web-based survey to a convenience sample of trainees worldwide. The survey was distributed by email and social media posts from April 20th to May 11th, 2020. Respondents were asked to estimate the number of patients with COVID-19 they cared for in March and April 2020 (0, 1-30, 31-60, >60). Survey questions addressed (1) safety and access to personal protective equipment (PPE), (2) training and professional development and (3) well-being and burnout.

RESULTS:

Surveys were completed by 1420 trainees (73% residents, 27% fellows), most commonly from the USA (n=670), China (n=150), Saudi Arabia (n=76) and Taiwan (n=75). Trainees who cared for a greater number of patients with COVID-19 were more likely to report limited access to PPE and COVID-19 testing and more likely to test positive for COVID-19. Compared with trainees who did not take care of patients with COVID-19 , those who took care of 1-30 patients (adjusted OR [AOR] 1.80, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.51), 31-60 patients (AOR 3.30, 95% CI 1.86 to 5.88) and >60 patients (AOR 4.03, 95% CI 2.12 to 7.63) were increasingly more likely to report burnout. Trainees were very concerned about the negative effects on training opportunities and professional development irrespective of the number of patients with COVID-19 they cared for.

CONCLUSION:

Exposure to patients with COVID-19 is significantly associated with higher burnout rates in physician trainees.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Attitude of Health Personnel / Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional / COVID-19 / Internship and Residency Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Young adult Language: English Journal: Postgrad Med J Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Postgradmedj-2020-138789

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Attitude of Health Personnel / Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional / COVID-19 / Internship and Residency Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Young adult Language: English Journal: Postgrad Med J Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Postgradmedj-2020-138789