Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Demographic and occupational determinants of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seropositivity in hospital staff.
Martin, Christopher A; Patel, Prashanth; Goss, Charles; Jenkins, David R; Price, Arthur; Barton, Linda; Gupta, Pankaj; Zaccardi, Francesco; Jerina, Helen; Duraisingham, Sai; Brunskill, Nigel J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Pareek, Manish.
  • Martin CA; Department of Respiratory Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
  • Patel P; Department of Infection and HIV Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Goss C; Department of Chemical Pathology and Metabolic Diseases, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Jenkins DR; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
  • Price A; Department of Occupational Health, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Barton L; Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Gupta P; Department of Immunology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Zaccardi F; Department of Haematology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Jerina H; Department of Chemical Pathology and Metabolic Diseases, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
  • Duraisingham S; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
  • Brunskill NJ; Diabetes Research Centre, Leicester General Hospital, University of Leicester, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK.
  • Khunti K; Leicester Real World Evidence Unit, Diabetes Research Centre, Leicester General Hospital, University of Leicester, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK.
  • Pareek M; Department of Chemical Pathology and Metabolic Diseases, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 2020 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926296
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Personne
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Personne
2. nhs trust LOCATION_OF Seroprevalence
Subject
nhs trust
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Seroprevalence
3. Breast Feeding PROCESS_OF Medical practitioner
Subject
Breast Feeding
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Medical practitioner
4. Risk Assessment TREATS Health Personnel
Subject
Risk Assessment
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Health Personnel
5. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Personnel, Hospital
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Personnel, Hospital
6. nhs trust LOCATION_OF Seroprevalence
Subject
nhs trust
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Seroprevalence
7. Breast Feeding PROCESS_OF Medical practitioner
Subject
Breast Feeding
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Medical practitioner
8. Risk Assessment TREATS Health Personnel
Subject
Risk Assessment
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Health Personnel
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Although evidence suggests that demographic characteristics including minority ethnicity increase the risk of infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), it is unclear whether these characteristics, together with occupational factors, influence anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence in hospital staff.

METHODS:

We conducted cross-sectional surveillance examining seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG amongst staff at University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) NHS Trust. We quantified seroprevalence stratified by ethnicity, occupation and seniority of practitioner and used logistic regression to examine demographic and occupational factors associated with seropositivity.

RESULTS:

A total of 1148/10662 (10.8%) hospital staff members were seropositive. Compared to White staff (seroprevalence 9.1%), seroprevalence was higher in South Asian (12.3%) and Black (21.2%) staff. The occupations and department with the highest seroprevalence were nurses/healthcare assistants (13.7%) and the Emergency Department (ED)/Acute Medicine (17.5%), respectively. Seroprevalence decreased with seniority in medical/nursing practitioners. Minority ethnicity was associated with seropositivity on an adjusted analysis (South Asian aOR 1.26; 95%CI 1.07-1.49 and Black 2.42; 1.90-3.09). Anaesthetics/ICU staff members were less likely to be seropositive than ED/Acute medicine staff (0.41; 0.27-0.61).

CONCLUSIONS:

Ethnicity and occupational factors, including specialty and seniority, are associated with seropositivity for anti-SARS-Cov-2 IgG. These findings could be used to inform occupational risk assessments for front-line healthcare workers.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Language: English Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Pubmed

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Language: English Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Pubmed