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Ambulatory neurosurgery in the COVID-19 era: patient and provider satisfaction with telemedicine.
Mohanty, Alina; Srinivasan, Visish M; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Akash J; Sheth, Sameer A; Viswanathan, Ashwin; Yoshor, Daniel; Kan, Peter.
  • Mohanty A; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Srinivasan VM; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Burkhardt JK; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Johnson J; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Patel AJ; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Sheth SA; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Viswanathan A; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Yoshor D; 1Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; and.
  • Kan P; 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E13, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953767
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Practitioner TREATS Patients
Subject
Practitioner
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Patients
2. Telemedicine COEXISTS_WITH Neurosurgical Procedures
Subject
Telemedicine
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Neurosurgical Procedures
3. Practitioner TREATS Patients
Subject
Practitioner
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Patients
4. Telemedicine COEXISTS_WITH Neurosurgical Procedures
Subject
Telemedicine
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
Neurosurgical Procedures
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

Telemedicine has rapidly expanded in the recent years as technologies have afforded healthcare practitioners the ability to diagnose and treat patients remotely. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, nonessential clinical visits were greatly limited, and much of the outpatient neurosurgical practice at the authors' institution was shifted quickly to telehealth. Although there are prior data suggesting that the use of telemedicine is satisfactory in other surgical fields, data in neurosurgery are limited. This study aimed to investigate both patient and provider satisfaction with telemedicine and its strengths and limitations in outpatient neurosurgery visits.

METHODS:

This quality improvement study was designed to analyze provider and patient satisfaction with telemedicine consultations in an outpatient neurosurgery clinic setting at a tertiary care, large-volume, academic center. The authors designed an 11-question survey for neurosurgical providers and a 13-question survey for patients using both closed 5-point Likert scale responses and multiple choice responses. The questionnaires were administered to patients and providers during the period when the clinic restricted in-person visits. At the conclusion of the study, the overall data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 607 surveys were sent out to patients seen by telehealth at the authors' academic center, and 122 responses were received. For the provider survey, 85 surveys were sent out to providers at the authors' center and other academic centers, and 40 surveys were received. Ninety-two percent of patients agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with that particular telehealth visit. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that their telehealth visit was more convenient for them than an in-person visit, but only 36% of patients stated they would like their future visits to be telehealth. Sixty-three percent of providers agreed that telehealth visits were more convenient for them than in-person visits, and 85% of responding providers stated that they wished to incorporate telehealth into their future practice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the authors' transition to telehealth was both rapid and unexpected, most providers and patients reported positive experiences with their telemedicine visits and found telemedicine to be an effective form of ambulatory neurosurgical care. Not all patients preferred telemedicine visits over in-person visits, but the high satisfaction with telemedicine by both providers and patients is promising to the future expansion of telehealth in ambulatory neurosurgery.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Patient Satisfaction / Health Personnel / Telemedicine / Neurosurgical Procedures / Ambulatory Surgical Procedures / COVID-19 Type of study: Qualitative research Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: Neurosurg Focus Journal subject: Neurosurgery Year: 2020 Document Type: Article

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Patient Satisfaction / Health Personnel / Telemedicine / Neurosurgical Procedures / Ambulatory Surgical Procedures / COVID-19 Type of study: Qualitative research Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: Neurosurg Focus Journal subject: Neurosurgery Year: 2020 Document Type: Article