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Transcriptomic similarities and differences in host response between SARS-CoV-2 and other viral infections.
Thair, Simone A; He, Yudong D; Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Sakaram, Suraj; Pandya, Rushika; Toh, Jiaying; Rawling, David; Remmel, Melissa; Coyle, Sabrina; Dalekos, George N; Koutsodimitropoulos, Ioannis; Vlachogianni, Glykeria; Gkeka, Eleni; Karakike, Eleni; Damoraki, Georgia; Antonakos, Nikolaos; Khatri, Purvesh; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Sweeney, Timothy E.
  • Thair SA; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • He YD; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Hasin-Brumshtein Y; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Sakaram S; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Pandya R; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Toh J; Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA.
  • Rawling D; Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
  • Remmel M; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Coyle S; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Dalekos GN; Inflammatix, Inc., 863 Mitten Road, Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA.
  • Koutsodimitropoulos I; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa General Hospital, Greece.
  • Vlachogianni G; Intensive Care Unit, Latseion General Hospital of Elefsis, Greece.
  • Gkeka E; Intensive Care Unit, Aghios Dimitrios Thessaloniki General Hospital, Greece.
  • Karakike E; Intensive Care Unit, AHEPA Thessaloniki General Hospital, Greece.
  • Damoraki G; 4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 124 62 Athens, Greece.
  • Antonakos N; 4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 124 62 Athens, Greece.
  • Khatri P; 4th Department of Internal Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, 124 62 Athens, Greece.
  • Giamarellos-Bourboulis EJ; Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA.
  • Sweeney TE; Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
iScience ; 24(1): 101947, 2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974141
Preprint
This scientific journal article is probably based on a previously available preprint. It has been identified through a machine matching algorithm, human confirmation is still pending.
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Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Disease PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
2. Gene Expression AFFECTS Disease
Subject
Gene Expression
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Disease
3. Disease PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
4. Gene Expression AFFECTS Disease
Subject
Gene Expression
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Disease
ABSTRACT
The pandemic 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) shares certain clinical characteristics with other acute viral infections. We studied the whole-blood transcriptomic host response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) using RNAseq from 24 healthy controls and 62 prospectively enrolled patients with COVID-19. We then compared these data to non-COVID-19 viral infections, curated from 23 independent studies profiling 1,855 blood samples covering six viruses (influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1), Ebola, dengue). We show gene expression changes in COVID-19 versus non-COVID-19 viral infections are highly correlated (r = 0.74, p < 0.001). However, we also found 416 genes specific to COVID-19. Inspection of top genes revealed dynamic immune evasion and counter host responses specific to COVID-19. Statistical deconvolution of cell proportions maps many cell type proportions concordantly shifting. Discordantly increased in COVID-19 were CD56bright natural killer cells and M2 macrophages. The concordant and discordant responses mapped out here provide a window to explore the pathophysiology of the host response to SARS-CoV-2.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Language: English Journal: IScience Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.isci.2020.101947

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Language: English Journal: IScience Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.isci.2020.101947