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Contribution of Temperature Increase to Restrain the Transmission of COVID-19.
Ren, Mengyuan; Pei, Rongjuan; Jiangtulu, Bahabaike; Chen, Junxi; Xue, Tao; Shen, Guofeng; Yuan, Xiaoru; Li, Kexin; Lan, Changxin; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Yun; Jia, Xiaoqian; Li, Zewu; Rashid, Audil; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Zhao, Xiuge; Dong, Zhaomin; Zhang, Yali; Zhang, Le; Ye, Rongwei; Li, Zhiwen; Guan, Wuxiang; Wang, Bin.
  • Ren M; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Pei R; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Jiangtulu B; Wuhan Institute of Virology, Center for Biosafety Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
  • Chen J; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Xue T; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Shen G; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Yuan X; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Li K; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Lan C; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Chen Z; College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, P. R. China.
  • Chen X; Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), and School of EECS, Peking University, Beijing, China.
  • Wang Y; Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS, Beijing 100101, P. R. China.
  • Jia X; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Li Z; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Rashid A; Wuhan Institute of Virology, Center for Biosafety Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
  • Prapamontol T; Wuhan Institute of Virology, Center for Biosafety Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
  • Zhao X; Wuhan Institute of Virology, Center for Biosafety Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
  • Dong Z; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Zhang Y; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Zhang L; Institute of Reproductive and Child Health, Peking University/ Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Ye R; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, P. R. China.
  • Li Z; Faculty of Science, Botany Department, University of Gujrat, Hafiz Hayat Campus, Gujrat-50700, Pakistan.
  • Guan W; Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Wang B; State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, P. R. China.
Innovation (N Y) ; 2(1): 100071, 2021 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978457
ABSTRACT
The COVID-19 outbreak has already become a global pandemic and containing this rapid worldwide transmission is of great challenge. The impacts of temperature and humidity on the COVID-19 transmission rate are still under discussion. Here, we elucidated these relationships by utilizing two unique scenarios, repeated measurement and natural experiment, using the COVID-19 cases reported from January 23 - February 21, 2020, in China. The modeling results revealed that higher temperature was most strongly associated with decreased COVID-19 transmission at a lag time of 8 days. Relative humidity (RH) appeared to have only a slight effect. These findings were verified by assessing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity under the relevant conditions of temperature (4°C-37°C) and RH (> 40%). We concluded that temperature increase made an important, but not determined, contribution to restrain the COVID-19 outbreak in China. It suggests that the emphasis of other effective controlling polices should be strictly implemented to restrain COVID-19 transmission in cold seasons.

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: Innovation (N Y) Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Prognostic study Language: English Journal: Innovation (N Y) Year: 2021 Document Type: Article