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Severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) seroprevalence in healthcare personnel in northern California early in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
Rosser, Joelle I; Röltgen, Katharina; Dymock, Melissa; Shepard, John; Martin, Andrew; Hogan, Catherine A; Blomkalns, Andra; Mathew, Roshni; Parsonnet, Julie; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Maldonado, Yvonne A; Boyd, Scott D; Chang, Sang-Ick; Holubar, Marisa.
  • Rosser JI; Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Röltgen K; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Dymock M; Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Shepard J; Stanford Health Care, Stanford, California.
  • Martin A; Stanford Health Care, Stanford, California.
  • Hogan CA; Stanford Health Care, Stanford, California.
  • Blomkalns A; Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Mathew R; Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Parsonnet J; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Pinsky BA; Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Maldonado YA; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Boyd SD; Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Chang SI; Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
  • Holubar M; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(9): 1053-1059, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989631
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Health Personnel DIAGNOSES COVID-19
Subject
Health Personnel
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DIAGNOSES
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COVID-19
2. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Health Personnel
Subject
COVID-19
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PROCESS_OF
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Health Personnel
3. risk factors PROCESS_OF Health Personnel
Subject
risk factors
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PROCESS_OF
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Health Personnel
4. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Persons
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
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PROCESS_OF
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5. Health Personnel DIAGNOSES COVID-19
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Health Personnel
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DIAGNOSES
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COVID-19
6. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Health Personnel
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COVID-19
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PROCESS_OF
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Health Personnel
7. risk factors PROCESS_OF Health Personnel
Subject
risk factors
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PROCESS_OF
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Health Personnel
8. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Persons
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2019 novel coronavirus
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ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the magnitude of unidentified coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in our healthcare personnel (HCP) early in the COVID-19 pandemic, and we evaluated risk factors for infection to identify areas for improvement in infection control practice in a northern California academic medical center.

METHODS:

We reviewed anti-severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) receptor-binding domain (RBD) IgG serologic test results and self-reported risk factors for seropositivity among 10,449 asymptomatic HCP who underwent voluntary serology testing between April 20 and May 20, 2020.

RESULTS:

In total, 136 employees (1.3%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 IgG. This included 41 individuals (30.1%) who had previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by nasopharyngeal reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) between March 13 and April 16, 2020. In multivariable analysis, employees of Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-3.46) and those working in environmental services, food services, or patient transport (OR, 4.81; 95% CI, 2.08-10.30) were at increased risk for seropositivity compared to other groups. Employees reporting a household contact with COVID-19 were also at higher risk for seropositivity (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.47-6.44), but those with a work, exposure alone were not (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.58-2.47). Importantly, one-third of seropositive individuals reported no prior symptoms, no suspected exposures, and no prior positive RT-PCR test.

CONCLUSION:

In this study, SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among HCP early in the northern California epidemic appeared to be quite low and was more likely attributable to community rather than occupational exposure.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Main subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol Clinical aspect: Etiology Year: 2021

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Main subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Subject: Pandemics / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol Clinical aspect: Etiology Year: 2021
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