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ABSTRACT

Objectives:

To investigate the intensity and longevity of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination response in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) by diagnosis, treatment and adapted vaccination schedules. Methods SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody response after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination was measured longitudinally in a large prospective cohort of healthy controls (HC) and IMID patients between December 2020 and 2021. Demographic and disease-specific data were recorded. Humoral response was compared across treatment and disease groups, and with respect to receipt of booster vaccinations. Age and sex adjusted SARS-CoV-2 antibody response was modelled over time. Marginal mean antibody levels and marginal risks of poor response were calculated at weekly intervals starting from week-8 after the first vaccination up to week 40. Results Among 5076 individuals registered, 2535 IMID patients and 1198 HC were eligible for this analysis. Mean antibody levels were higher in HC compared to IMIDs at all-time points, with peak antibody response in HC more than twice that in IMIDs (12.48 (11.52-13.52) vs. 5.71 (5.46-5.97)). Poor response to vaccination was observed in IMID patients treated with agents affecting B- and T-cell functions. Mean differences in antibody response between IMID diseases were small. After additional vaccinations, IMID patients could achieve higher antibody levels than HC vaccinated according to the two-dose schedule, even-though initial antibody levels were lower. Conclusions IMID patients show a lower and less durable SARS-CoV-2 vaccination response and are at risk to lose humoral immune protection. Adjusted vaccination schedules with earlier boosters and/or more frequent re-doses could better protect IMID patients.

Full text: Available Collection: Preprints Database: EuropePMC Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Preprint

Full text: Available Collection: Preprints Database: EuropePMC Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines Language: English Year: 2022 Document Type: Preprint